coalbed natural gas http://wyomingpublicradio.net en Coalbed Methane Extraction Altered Water Quality In Powder River, Study Finds http://wyomingpublicradio.net/post/coalbed-methane-extraction-altered-water-quality-powder-river-study-finds <p>A U.S. Geological Survey study shows that coalbed methane development has changed the chemistry of the surface water in parts of the Powder River. CBM wastewater was often discharged directly or indirectly into the stream. &nbsp;</p><p>The study analyzed three decades of data and determined that after extraction activities, the water contained more sodium and bicarbonate, which are compounds commonly found in CBM wastewater.</p><p>Report author Steve Sando says high sodium levels can be bad for irrigation, but he says the concentrations in the Powder River are not alarmingly high.</p> Fri, 28 Feb 2014 01:18:10 +0000 Willow Belden 54668 at http://wyomingpublicradio.net Coalbed Methane Extraction Altered Water Quality In Powder River, Study Finds Luca Technologies files for bankruptcy http://wyomingpublicradio.net/post/luca-technologies-files-bankruptcy <p>Luca Technologies, a Colorado-based biotechnology company focused on extracting natural gas from coal seams in Wyoming, has declared bankruptcy.</p><p>Luca began testing their “methane farming” method in the Powder River basin in 2006. Since then, they have faced regulatory and financial difficulties which have resulted in permitting delays, layoffs, and now, finally Chapter 11 bankruptcy.</p><p>Methane farming generates natural gas by feeding nutrients to microbes in coal beds.</p> Thu, 08 Aug 2013 23:15:49 +0000 Chelsea Biondolillo 45069 at http://wyomingpublicradio.net Luca Technologies files for bankruptcy USGS study shows gas production can affect stream water http://wyomingpublicradio.net/post/usgs-study-shows-gas-production-can-affect-stream-water <p>A new report by the U.S. Geological Survey finds that coal-bed natural gas production can affect water quality in nearby streams.</p><p>The study monitored water quality over a ten-year period in Wyoming and Montana, and found that in places like the Powder River, sodium levels increased. Other test sites showed little or no change in water quality.</p><p>Report author Melanie Clark says the changes occur because water that&rsquo;s extracted during gas production sometimes flows into the streams and rivers.</p> Sat, 28 Jul 2012 00:36:54 +0000 Willow Belden 27627 at http://wyomingpublicradio.net USGS study shows gas production can affect stream water