Art & Design
2:00 am
Thu December 15, 2011

1960's Los Angeles Gave Artists Freedom

Originally published on Thu December 15, 2011 5:11 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And it may be surprising to many outside Los Angeles to hear that it has an art scene that goes back to the middle of the last century - maybe because the '50s and '60s in Southern California was a vast landscape dotted with car culture, beach culture, and a growing aerospace industry. Not necessarily art, one thinks.

It was also, though, the home of an art scene which attracted artists who were rejected in New York. That's something Hunter Drohojowska-Philp writes about in her book "Rebels in Paradise."

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Business
2:00 am
Thu December 15, 2011

Business News

Hewlett Packard has been under fire for the golden parachutes it awards outgoing CEOs. A chief let go earlier this year received nearly $10 million in severance and bonuses for what was less than a year's work. And the CEO fired before that received nearly $35 million when he left.

NPR Story
2:00 am
Thu December 15, 2011

OPEC Sets Higher Production Ceiling

Oil futures are recovering after falling to a five-week low Wednesday, amid fears of declining demand and OPEC's decision to set a higher production ceiling for the next six months. The decision effectively ratified Saudi Arabia's move in recent months to pump more oil in an attempt to rein in soaring crude prices.

NPR Story
2:00 am
Thu December 15, 2011

Ala. Ethics Law Restricts Gifts To Teachers

In Alabama, a teacher who takes a Christmas ham as a gift from a student could get jail time. That's because of a new ethics law the governor wants changed. The new law severely restricts gifts to teachers.

Chompsgiving To Chew Year's: Holiday Dishes
1:26 am
Thu December 15, 2011

Savoring The Tradition Of Holiday Sauerkraut

Reporter Julie Rose's great-great-grandmother, Mary, and her husband, Frank Joseph Dusek
Courtesy of Jule Rose

Originally published on Thu December 15, 2011 10:25 am

Part of an ongoing series on unique holiday dishes

My great-great-grandma Mary Dusek kept alive the Czech heritage of her parents and immigrant husband through food. In the one photo I've seen of her, she's wearing a crisp, white apron. Our signature holiday dish comes from Mary's kitchen.

My mom, Dee Dee — Mary's great-granddaughter — is the keeper of the Dusek kraut tradition.

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Youth Radio
10:01 pm
Wed December 14, 2011

An Early College Economics Lesson For One Student

Youth Radio's Sayre Quevedo, 19, attends community college and lives in Oakland, Calif.
Courtesy of Youth Radio

Originally published on Thu December 15, 2011 10:41 am

One day last year, I skipped school to wait for acceptances from colleges. It was the final day that letters or emails were supposed to be sent out.

I sat in front of my laptop by the front door for at least three hours, listening for the mailman while eagerly pressing the refresh button on my inbox. I admit, at one point, I checked my neighbor's mail. Getting my house skipped on the mail route was one of the less crazy hypotheticals I imagined while waiting.

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It's All Politics
10:01 pm
Wed December 14, 2011

State Of The GOP Race: Are We In For A Protracted Primary Season?

Mitt Romney and Newt Gingrich face off at the ABC News GOP Presidential Debate on Dec. 10.
Kevork Djansezian Getty Images

Originally published on Thu December 15, 2011 9:53 am

The mitts are off, so to speak, in the Republican presidential primary. Mitt Romney, the former front-runner, and his current and most serious rival, Newt Gingrich, are now engaged in an all-out war.

With only a few short weeks until voters in Iowa go to the caucuses, Romney is doing everything he can to stop Gingrich's sudden and surprising rise.

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Still No Job: Over A Year Without Enough Work
10:01 pm
Wed December 14, 2011

Willing To Sacrifice After A Long Time Out Of Work

According to a survey by NPR and the Kaiser Family Foundation, 44 percent of the long-term unemployed and 35 percent of the underemployed are willing to move to another state for a new job.
Tony Tremblay iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu December 15, 2011 2:08 pm

In the past three years, the ability and willingness of Americans to move across town or to another state have fallen to their lowest level in more than half a century.

An NPR/Kaiser Family Foundation survey examined mobility among the long-term unemployed and underemployed. Of those two groups combined, 40 percent said they would be willing to move to another state to find a job.

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Business
10:01 pm
Wed December 14, 2011

With New Toys, Lego Hopes To Build Girls Market

The new Lego Friends toys are not yet public, but the company gave a sneak peek at its "Olivia" minifigure from the set.
Courtesy of Bloomberg Businessweek. Photographed by Nick Ferrari

Originally published on Thu December 15, 2011 4:45 am

Lego doesn't call itself a toy company for boys. But look at the company's website, and its products are clearly geared towards boys' love of combat and action. There's Lego Star Wars, Lego Indiana Jones, Alien Conquest, Racers and Superheroes. One lonely set, called Belleville, is clearly for girls. It's pink-themed and features a horse.

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Law
10:01 pm
Wed December 14, 2011

Death Sentences Drop To Historic Lows In 2011

The high-profile case of Troy Davis sparked national debate on the death penalty. Richard Dieter, executive director of the Death Penalty Information Center, says there's growing discontent among Americans about capital punishment.
David Tulis AP

Originally published on Thu December 15, 2011 9:05 am

Death sentences dropped dramatically this year, marking the first time in more than three decades that judges and juries sent fewer than 100 people to death row, according to a new report from the Death Penalty Information Center.

Just 78 offenders were handed capital sentences, and only 43 inmates were executed — almost half as many as 10 years ago.

American Reaction

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