Shots - Health Blog
3:08 pm
Wed December 7, 2011

Shape Up, America, Before It's Too Late

America's Health Rankings

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History
3:03 pm
Wed December 7, 2011

A Birds-Eye History Of Walking On Stilts

French stilt dancers from Landes, in southwestern France, walk through London on their way to the 1937 Silver Jubilee Festival of the English Folk Dance and Song Society.
Fox Photos Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 9:12 am

A couple of years ago, NPR's Robert Siegel had a 5-year-old kid moment.

He was in the new wing of a hospital watching a workman put up drywall and, as drywall installers are wont to do, the workman reached the top of the wall by walking on stilts.

The 5-year-old inside the radio host was suddenly enchanted by the thought of stilts, so Siegel set out to learn more; first through Google, then from Joe Bowen, who walked more than 3,000 miles across the country on stilts in 1980.

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Europe
3:00 pm
Wed December 7, 2011

The Latest Greek Drama: Government Statistics

Andreas Georgiou was picked last year to run Greece's statistical agency. He promised more accurate financial data. He has won praise, though now he is under investigation following claims the country's budget deficit was artificially inflated.
Petros Giannakouris AP

Originally published on Tue February 7, 2012 3:31 pm

Greece fudged its budget numbers to enter the euro club, and its reputation as a source of accurate financial figures never really improved. As the country's financial crisis has worsened, the joke about its suspect fiscal numbers comes with the punch line, "lies, damn lies ... and Greek statistics."

The country sought to improve its standing last year when it created a new and independent statistical service, the Hellenic Statistical Authority.

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Education
2:52 pm
Wed December 7, 2011

Friendly Advice For Teachers: Beware Of Facebook

Teachers have been fired for comments they posted on Facebook, which raises free speech issues and questions about how teachers should interact on social media.
Sturti IStockPhoto

The new and ever-changing world of social networking has blurred the lines between private and public, work and personal, friend and stranger. It's becoming a particular challenge for teachers who can quickly rile students and parents by posting comments or photos online.

In some cases, teachers have been fired for statements they've made on Facebook, which is raising free speech issues.

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Middle East
2:09 pm
Wed December 7, 2011

A Brutal Detention, And A Defiant Syrian Activist

This summer, NPR told the story of a young man in Syria who worked a regular job by day and was a protester by night. At the end of that story, the activist made a prediction that was later tweeted to thousands of people: "One day my time is coming. Until the world realizes what's happening in Syria, they will try and get us all."

Many weeks later, his prediction came true.

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The Two-Way
2:06 pm
Wed December 7, 2011

As Protests Face Hurdles, Gorbachev Calls For New Elections In Russia

Reuters reports that today protesters in Moscow faced a huge increase in security presence that essentially stopped a mass protest against last weekend's parliamentary elections.

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Author Interviews
2:01 pm
Wed December 7, 2011

A New Look At The Man Behind U.S. Cold War Policy

Originally published on Wed December 7, 2011 3:55 pm

For much of the Cold War, George F. Kennan was America's best-known diplomat and a leading Soviet scholar. His reputation was based in large part on the 1947 essay he wrote on containment, the Cold War policy that said the U.S. should neither forcefully confront nor meekly appease the Soviets.

Rather, the U.S. should seek to contain Soviet expansion, power and influence in the belief that the communist system would eventually collapse on its own. The U.S. largely adhered to Kennan's road map until the Soviet Union crumbled in 1991.

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Middle East
2:01 pm
Wed December 7, 2011

Islamist Parties At Odds In Egypt's Ongoing Elections

Egyptian soldiers stand in front of campaign posters for candidates from the hard-line Islamist Salafist Al-Nour party, in the coastal city of Alexandria.
AFP/Getty Images

As the Egyptian elections roll on over the course of several more weeks, the incoming parliament looks likely to be dominated by Islamists. But the two leading Islamist blocs have little in common and are doing their best to undermine each other.

The Muslim Brotherhood and Salafists do not get along in Alexandria's working-class slum of Abu Suleiman. Outside one polling station, the tension is thick as campaign workers for each group's political party hand out fliers.

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Planet Money
2:00 pm
Wed December 7, 2011

Can Eurozone Countries Actually Follow Their Own Rules This Time?

Protestors in front of the Greek Parliament in Athens in 2010, demonstrating against the EU's Growth and Stability Pact.
Aris Messinis AFP/Getty Images

When the euro was set up in the late 1990s, the Stability and Growth Pact clearly spelled out the criteria for membership: Countries could not have huge debts, and they needed to keep deficits small. And there was no question — the rules explicitly excluded a little country named Greece.

"If you asked someone in Europe whether Greece would join the eurozone, the answer would have been you are mad, " says Loukas Tsoukalis with the Hellenic Foundation for European and Foreign Policy.

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Shots - Health Blog
1:51 pm
Wed December 7, 2011

Why Observing Prostate Cancers Is Gaining Ground On Surgery

Originally published on Wed December 7, 2011 2:26 pm

A federally convened panel of experts says most men with newly diagnosed prostate cancer should be offered the chance to put off treatment in favor of medical monitoring of their condition.

In fact, the panel went so far as to say doctors should stop calling most of these low-risk tumors cancer at all.

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