Around the Nation
2:35 am
Tue September 27, 2011

Estate Liquidators See A Frenzy Of Speculation

Gold rings and heirloom jewelry like these pieces displayed in a San Francisco store are fetching record high prices this year.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

The high price of gold and other precious metals is encouraging a new breed of gold diggers — traveling estate buyers who temporarily set up shop in hotels. They offer to pay cash on the spot for gold, diamonds, old Rolexes and collectibles.

Walking into one such event at a hotel, it all seems very professional: A fancy conference room with a 20-foot conference table, with soothing bossa nova music playing overhead.

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Europe
2:00 am
Tue September 27, 2011

Greek Parliament Weighs Property Tax Amid Protests

Originally published on Tue September 27, 2011 6:57 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, host: It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

DAVID GREENE, host: And I'm David Greene. Greece's government hopes to approve a new property tax in parliament today. There is wide opposition to the measure from a Greek public that's already feeling the pain from austerity measures. The government says the new tax is a must to prove that the country deserves more international bailout money to prop up the Greek economy. NPR's Sylvia Poggioli joins us on the line from Athens.

Sylvia, good morning.

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World
2:00 am
Tue September 27, 2011

Eurozone's Looming Financial Crisis

For a long time, much of the world saw the eurozone sovereign debt crisis as Europe's problem. Now world leaders, including the United States, realize a eurozone meltdown could have dire consequences for everyone. They are working up a massive rescue plan whose contours are beginning to emerge. Although Britain does not use the euro, that nation's politicians are using their party conventions to issue dire warnings about the euro's fate. And one eminent economist is proposing a novel solution to limit the impact of the European debt crisis.

U.S.
2:00 am
Tue September 27, 2011

Senate Deal To Avert Shutdown Goes To House

Originally published on Tue September 27, 2011 6:57 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, host: It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene.

STEVE INSKEEP, host: And I'm Steve Inskeep.

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Media
1:34 am
Tue September 27, 2011

News Corp.'s U.K. Actions Under Scrutiny In U.S.

The News Corp. headquarters in New York City.
Timothy A. Clary AFP/Getty Images

The British newspaper arm of Rupert Murdoch's News Corp. is in negotiations to pay several million dollars to settle the claims of the family of a slain girl whose mobile voice mail messages were hacked by a private investigator for one of its tabloids. Murdoch would personally pay more than $1.5 million to charity as part of the deal.

But that's only the latest fallout for News Corp. in the phone hacking and bribery scandal there.

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Retirement In America: The Not-So-Golden Years
1:32 am
Tue September 27, 2011

Retirement: Reality Not As Rosy As Expectations

According to a new poll by NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard School of Public Health, life in retirement is better or the same as it was before, but it is worse for a substantial minority in key areas, including health and finances.
David Goldman AP

Americans pride themselves on being optimistic. But Robert Blendon, of the Harvard School of Public Health, says that may not be such a good thing when it comes to planning for retirement. For many Americans, it is proving harder than they imagined, according to a a new poll by NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard School of Public Health.

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The Two-Way
5:15 pm
Mon September 26, 2011

Senate Strikes Deal That Likely Averts Government Shutdown

It looks like the government will be funded until Nov. 18. According to multiple news reports, Senate leaders announced they have come to an agreement that will likely avoid a partial shutdown of the government.

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The Two-Way
4:03 pm
Mon September 26, 2011

Texas Convict Sets House On Fire To Return To Prison

Randall Lee Church was 18 when he was convicted and sentenced to life for fatally stabbing a man. That was 1983 with just glimmers of the Internet and ideas of mobile phones.

So when he was released after 26 years in prison, he was overwhelmed and lost.

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The Two-Way
3:00 pm
Mon September 26, 2011

VIDEO: Atop Washington Monument, Visitors Scrambled During Quake

Visitors near the top of the Washington Monument headed for the stairs as it rocked back and forth. Debris was falling inside.
National Park Service

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The Two-Way
2:43 pm
Mon September 26, 2011

Dead Sea Scrolls Are Now Online

The Dead Sea Scrolls are 2,000 years old and very sensitive to direct light. At the Israel Museum in Jerusalem, where they are housed, the scrolls are rotated every few months to minimize the damage. As Bloomberg explains it, the Great Isaiah Scroll, which is the most ancient biblical manuscript on Earth, is so sensitive that only a copy of it is on display.

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