Europe
2:00 am
Mon September 19, 2011

Greece Scrambles To Show It Can Cut Budget Deficit

A woman walks past an advertisement of the national lottery in Athens. Public outrage over austerity measures is intense, and a new levy on real estate has been dubbed the "monster tax."
Louisa Gouliamaki AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue August 7, 2012 1:43 pm

It's a critical period for Greece: It has to convince international lenders that it can slash its budget deficit before getting a vital $11 billion installment of last year's $150 billion bailout deal.

Prime Minister George Papandreou canceled a trip to the U.S. to hold an emergency Cabinet meeting Sunday on finding more cuts to plug this year's budget shortfall. Greece has blamed the shortfall on a deeper-than-expected recession — the unintended effect of a year and a half of draconian austerity measures.

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Europe
10:01 pm
Sun September 18, 2011

Europe's Dilemma: More Integration Or Less?

European governments seem to be having a hard time deciding whether to come together or drift apart at a time of economic uncertainty.

Years from now, historians will no doubt say this was a crisis waiting to happen. The people who came up with the idea of a eurozone stopped halfway. The participating countries would use a common currency, but they wouldn't have common tax and spending policies — a monetary union but not a fiscal union.

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Law
10:01 pm
Sun September 18, 2011

Could Texas' Redistricting Leave Latinos Behind?

The Texas State Capitol is seen late Jan. 18, in Austin.
Eric Gay AP

Originally published on Mon September 19, 2011 3:25 am

Political experts are keeping a close eye on Texas because it will pick up four new seats in the U.S. House of Representatives next year, thanks to a soaring Latino population. But civil rights groups and the U.S. Justice Department are signaling they may have some concerns about the redistricting process in Texas and whether it could put Latino voters at a disadvantage.

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Around the Nation
10:01 pm
Sun September 18, 2011

Man's Call To America: Turn Off That Air Conditioner

Stan Cox has air conditioning in his Kansas house — but he only runs the unit about once a year, he says.
Bryan Thompson Kansas Public Radio

Originally published on Wed September 21, 2011 10:01 pm

According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, this summer has been the second-hottest ever recorded in the United States, helping to push power demand in homes to record levels. As some worry that the growing use of fossil fuels to produce electricity for cooling is unsustainable, one man is urging Americans to live without air conditioning.

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The Evolution Of A Startup
10:01 pm
Sun September 18, 2011

The Ups And Downs Of A Tech Startup Rollercoaster

Craig Guenther-Lee (from left), Chad Reed and Naresh Dhiman co-founded Bluebox Now, a startup that links business' data about customers with information they posted online.
Wendy Kaufman NPR

Bluebox Now is an aspiring, young startup that aims to revolutionize how companies market to their customers. Like entrepreneurs everywhere, the trio who founded the firm dream of making it big.

Now, they're trying to perfect their product, garner customers, bring in revenue and — they hope — profits.

Earlier this year, the founders of Bluebox Now, all in their 30s and 40s, were faced with a choice. The company they were working for was bought out, and they had to decide what to do next.

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Your Health
10:01 pm
Sun September 18, 2011

HPV Vaccine: The Science Behind The Controversy

Experts disagree about whether girls as young as 11 should get the HPV vaccine.
Mike Kemp iStockphoto.com

The first vaccine against human papillomavirus, or HPV, which causes cervical cancer, came out five years ago. But now it's become a hot political topic, thanks to a Republican presidential debate in which candidate Michelle Bachmann inveighed against "innocent little 12-year-old girls" being "forced to have a government injection."

Behind the political fireworks is a quieter backlash against a public health strategy that's won powerful advocates in the medical and public health community.

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Shots - Health Blog
9:00 pm
Sun September 18, 2011

Teens And Tweens Find They Too Need Vaccines To Attend School

Trevor Reese, 13, gets his diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis booster shot from pediatric nurse practitioner Jenny Lu in Tustin, Calif., in August.
Jae C. Hong AP

Parents used to think that once their kids were out of elementary school, they were done with vaccines. But the rules are changing.

In California, middle schoolers and high schoolers now have to prove that they're immunized against pertussis, or whooping cough, in order to attend school. It's one of dozens of states that have recently passed laws requiring vaccines for teens and tweens.

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Middle East
2:15 pm
Sun September 18, 2011

American Presidents On Palestine

In 1948, President Truman endorsed the creation of an Israeli state. Nearly three decades later, before finalizing the Camp David accords, Jimmy Carter became the first U.S. president to call for the creation of a Palestinian "homeland." Presidents have put their own spins on that effort ever since. Here's a sampling:

March 16, 1977 — Carter, at a town hall meeting in Massachusetts, said that after Palestinians recognize Israel's right to exist, "There has to be a homeland provided for the Palestinian refugees who have suffered for many, many years."

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Television
1:34 pm
Sun September 18, 2011

'Mad Men's' Blankenship: Dying To Go To The Emmys

Actress Randee Heller (right) toasts Miss Ida Blankenship, the character that earned her an Emmy nomination for Mad Men.
Bobby Quillard

AMC's Mad Men is one of the big favorites at Sunday night's Emmy Awards — and this past season's most memorable character may have been Don Draper's new secretary, Miss Ida Blankenship.

Played by Randee Heller, Miss Blankenship was a departure from the attractive, attentive young girls that usually wait on Draper. She stole every scene she was in, even in death. Her passing was both shocking and comical and became one of the most talked-about moments of the TV season.

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Middle East
12:33 pm
Sun September 18, 2011

Jimmy Carter: 'No Downside' To Palestinian Statehood

A Palestinian flag is raised in front of European Union headquarters in Brussels on Monday, September 12th. The Palestinians are expected to seek statehood at the United Nations next week.
John Thys AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun September 18, 2011 2:21 pm

Former President Jimmy Carter urges the United States to not veto the Security Council vote for Palestinian statehood anticipated to take place next week.

"If I were president, I'd be very glad to see the Palestinians have a nation recognized by the United Nations," Carter tells Guy Raz, host of weekends on All Things Considered. "There's no downside to it."

Carter admits that for President Obama, failure to veto "would have some adverse effects perhaps on his political future."

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