Education
6:00 am
Sat September 17, 2011

Anti-Bullying Laws Get Tough With Schools

New Jersey's Anti-Bullying Bill of Rights, considered by many as the toughest legislation against bullying in the nation, went into effect this month. Host Scott Simon talks with Emily Bazelon of Slate Magazine about bullying laws, where they're working and where they're headed (hint: the Supreme Court).

Around the Nation
6:00 am
Sat September 17, 2011

Devastating Crash Closes Reno Air Show

Originally published on Sat September 17, 2011 7:52 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, Host:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. At least three people died, and more than 50 were injured, at an air show in Nevada late yesterday afternoon. A plane participating in the Reno Air Races crashed into a group of spectators, and the scene was horrific. From Reno Public Radio, Brandon Rittiman reports.

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Middle East
6:00 am
Sat September 17, 2011

Palestinian Push For Statehood Comes To A Head

Originally published on Wed September 21, 2011 9:54 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, Host:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon.

The world comes to New York next week for the annual gathering of the U.N. General Assembly. This year's meeting is going to feature a diplomatic showdown. Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas announced yesterday that he'll seek Palestinian statehood through the Security Council, a move the United States has said it would veto. NPR's foreign correspondent Lourdes Garcia-Navarro joins us from Jerusalem.

Lourdes, thanks for being with us.

LOURDES GARCIA: You're welcome.

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Around the Nation
6:00 am
Sat September 17, 2011

Obamas Kick Back With White House Homebrew

Former Marine Sgt. Dakota Meyer, who was awarded the Medal of Honor this week, had one simple request. He wanted to have a beer with the president. So they sat down with a pint of White House Honey Ale, the first beer made at the White House. Apparently, when the Obama's moved in, they brought beer-making with them.

Economy
6:00 am
Sat September 17, 2011

Europeans Split Over Debt Crisis

After another week of financial turmoil in Europe, there was little hope that the Eurozone debt crisis is any closer to being resolved. NPR's Eric Westervelt in Berlin and Sylvia Poggioli in Athens join host Scott Simon to discuss how northern and southern Europeans differ in their attitudes to the debt crisis in Europe.

Sports
6:00 am
Sat September 17, 2011

Sports: Tigers Make Playoffs; NBA Lockout Blues

Originally published on Sat September 17, 2011 7:52 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, Host:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon, and I wait all week to say: Time for sports.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

SIMON: There's cheering in Detroit today, sighs of relief all over New England, for now. And pro basketball braces for the sounds of silence.

NPR sports correspondent Tom Goldman joins us from the great Northwest. Good morning, Tom.

TOM GOLDMAN: Hello, Scott.

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Sports
6:00 am
Sat September 17, 2011

Runner Takes On Record-Breaking Mission For Mom

Former Yale track star Sam Fox is trying to break the record for running the entire length of the Pacific Crest Trail all the way from Canada to Mexico. But, as Dave Iverson from member station KQED in San Francisco reports, this long distance challenge is about more than just the record books.

Around the Nation
6:00 am
Sat September 17, 2011

Nashville Schools Rock Music Education

When many public schools are cutting back on arts education, schools in Nashville are expanding their music departments and offering classes in country, rock and rap. Host Scott Simon reflects.

Education
6:00 am
Sat September 17, 2011

Shrinking Budgets Put School Support On The Block

Across the country, a group of education administrators, known as regional superintendents, are seeing their budgets shrink. These administrators are involved in providing services like teacher certification and other support for school districts. In Illinois, the state's 44 regional superintendents have been working without pay since the governor zeroed out their funding in July. Maria Altman of St. Louis Public Radio reports that the issue of whether or not these officials are needed at all is coming to a head.

Economy
5:02 am
Sat September 17, 2011

Median Male Worker's Income Lower Than In 1973

Tuesday the government's annual poverty and income report revealed that the earnings of male workers in the middle of the income ladder are lower today than they were almost 40 years ago.

In 1973 the median male worker earned just over $49,000 when adjusted for inflation, while in 2010 that worker made about $1,500 less. Yet, in the same period, the output of the economy has more than doubled, and the productivity of workers has risen steadily.

What Has Changed

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