Reflecting On Sept. 11, 2001
2:12 am
Sun September 11, 2011

After Burn Injuries, Sept. 11 Survivor Shows 'Strength'

Lauren and Greg Manning stand with their sons Jagger and Tyler (right) at the Central Park Zoo in 2010. Manning became a symbol of survival after the Sept. 11 attacks, where she suffered burns on more than 80 percent of her body.
Courtesy Lauren Manning

No company suffered on Sept. 11 as much as the bond broker Cantor Fitzgerald, which lost 658 people. One of the few employees to survive that day was Lauren Manning, who was in the lobby of the World Trade Center's North Tower when the first plane hit.

Manning had been rushing to an elevator and was instantly engulfed in flames that came into the lobby, leaving her with burns on more than 80 percent of her body.

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Margot Adler is a NPR correspondent based in NPR's New York Bureau. Her reports can be heard regularly on All Things Considered, Morning Edition and Weekend Edition.

Reflecting On Sept. 11, 2001
1:23 pm
Sat September 10, 2011

After Sept. 11, A 'Missed Opportunity' For America

A man standing in rubble shouts to see if anyone needs help after the collapse of the first World Trade Center Tower in New York on Sept. 11, 2001.
Doug Kanter AFP/Getty Images

The terrorist attacks on Sept. 11, 2001, have been pegged as the moment that changed everything for Americans. Nothing was supposed to be the same after the attacks, and it was expected to usher in a new era for America.

Writer George Packer remembers having a moment of optimism.

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U.S.
1:00 pm
Sat September 10, 2011

Memorial To Flight 93 Dedicated In Pa.

Former Presidents George W. Bush and Bill Clinton join current Vice President Joe Biden at a ceremony in Shanksville, Pa., where United Flight 93 crashed 10 years ago tomorrow.

Economy
12:33 pm
Sat September 10, 2011

Corporate Taxes: How Low Can You Go?

Google's Netherlands Office has an indoor bike lane.
Google Press

The idea that America's 35 percent corporate tax rate is stifling U.S. economic growth is almost an article of faith among some politicians.

The sound bites from Republican presidential debates to campaign stops are basically interchangeable: "We need to bring that corporate tax rate down."

But in fact, very few corporations pay taxes on 35 percent of their profits. With the help of complex international tax loopholes, some companies manage to pay almost no corporate tax at all.

'Double Irish, Dutch Sandwich'

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Reflecting On Sept. 11, 2001
12:32 pm
Sat September 10, 2011

Bush Aide Feith: 2 Of 3 Anti-Terror Goals Were Met

Doug Feith served four years in the George W. Bush administration as Donald Rumsfeld's undersecretary of defense for policy. He is now a senior fellow at the Hudson Institute.
Courtesy of Doug Feith

Originally published on Sat September 10, 2011 4:40 pm

The attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, reshaped the U.S. foreign policy agenda, says Doug Feith, who was undersecretary of defense for policy in the Bush administration.

He sees the top two goals of that new agenda as achieved: preventing future attacks and disrupting terror networks. But he says the U.S. failed on the other goal: countering ideological support for terrorism.

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Afghanistan
4:16 am
Sat September 10, 2011

Pakistan Could Be Vital To 'Afghan-Led' Peace Process

Pfc. Natan Martinez fires a machine gun from a position near the Pakistan border in Afghanistan. There is concern in Pakistan about the U.S. preserving a security presence in Afghanistan beyond 2014, the deadline to pull out most if not all U.S. combat troops.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Fri September 23, 2011 11:05 am

An end to the war in Afghanistan is slowly beginning to come into view, 10 years after the Sept. 11 attacks. Few countries have been as deeply affected by the decade of fighting as Pakistan.

Since 2001, Islamist extremism fueled by the Afghan conflict has claimed the lives of 35,000 Pakistanis — 30,000 of them civilians.

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Reflecting On Sept. 11, 2001
4:06 am
Sat September 10, 2011

Tennessee Town Grapples With Sept. 11 Legacy

Hundreds of men pray at the Islamic Center of Murfreesboro, Tenn. The congregation wants to build a new, bigger place to worship, but has faced stiff opposition from citizens who fear the local Muslims have a political agenda. Imam Ossama Bahloul says it's nonsense to think the congregation is a threat.
Debbie Elliott

In Murfreesboro, Tenn., more than 5,000 people are expected Sunday for the annual Sept. 11 memorial. What started as a small flag ceremony at the Rutherford County's Sheriff's Department 10 years ago is now a major community event. Murfreesboro has been dealing with another legacy of the attacks, which is playing out in a controversy over a mosque.

A Local Response To The Trauma

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Reflecting On Sept. 11, 2001
4:03 am
Sat September 10, 2011

With TSA, Are We Safer Or Sorry?

At the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History, a small temporary exhibit marks Sept. 11, 2001. Along with artifacts found in the wreckage of the World Trade Center and the Pentagon — like a smashed firetruck door and twisted bits of fuselage — is a bin filled with every imaginable object people have tried to carry on airplanes.

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Science
3:34 am
Sat September 10, 2011

Thirsty Birds 'Burn the Engine' In Flight

A Swainson's thrush flies a mock-migration in the wind tunnel at the University of Western Ontario.
Science AAAS

Migratory songbirds like Swainson's thrushes spend their winters in South and Central America. But as spring approaches, they fly thousands of miles north to Canada.

Along the way, these little birds show endurance that would shame even the toughest athletes. They can fly for up to eight hours straight without stopping for food or water.

Scientists know how birds cope without food during the flights: They burn fat. But until now, they haven't figured out the water question. How do migrating birds avoid dehydration after all that flying?

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