It's All Politics
6:15 am
Mon August 29, 2011

Powell Isn't Sure He'll Support Obama In 2012 Race

Former Secretary of State Colin Powell during his appearance Sunday on CBS News' Face the Nation.
Chris Usher CBS News via Getty Images

Originally published on Mon August 29, 2011 6:19 am

It was a big story when former Secretary of State Colin Powell, a Republican, endorsed Democrat Barack Obama during the 2008 presidential campaign.

So it's news that this weekend on CBS-TV's Face the Nation, Powell said he hasn't decided if he will vote for the president in 2012.

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The Two-Way
6:15 am
Mon August 29, 2011

Powell: Cheney's Taking 'Cheap Shots'

Former Secretary of State Colin Powell during his appearance Sunday on CBS News' Face the Nation.
Chris Usher CBS News via Getty Images

Originally published on Mon August 29, 2011 6:55 am

Colin Powell isn't a fan of Dick Cheney's new memoir.

On CBS News' Face the Nation this weekend, former Bush administration secretary of state Powell said that Bush-era vice president Cheney takes some "cheap shots" and "overshot the runway" in the book that goes on sale this week.

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The Two-Way
5:45 am
Mon August 29, 2011

New Leader Set In Japan; Gadhafi Still On Run

Good morning.

Residents from North Carolina up through New England are beginning the long process of recovering from Hurricane Irene, which we followed through the weekend and earlier today.

We'll keep an eye out for more stories about the storm and its aftermath. Meanwhile, other major news of the day includes:

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The Two-Way
5:15 am
Mon August 29, 2011

Irene: Not A Monster, But Lots Of Damage

Flooding Sunday in Waitsfield, Vt.
Sandy Macys AP

Originally published on Mon August 29, 2011 5:27 am

Hurricane Irene is gone, but she won't be forgotten anytime soon.

As NPR's Larry Abramson said today on Morning Edition, "Irene did not turn out to be the storm of the century" and many beach towns "were stunned by how lucky they were."

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Around the Nation
2:09 am
Mon August 29, 2011

Irene: Wet, Deadly And Expensive, But No Monster

A surfer in Long Beach, N.Y., passes heavy machinery Monday that was removing the remnants of a lifeguard shack that was knocked off its footing during Irene.
Craig Ruttle AP

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 9:29 am

The remnants of Hurricane Irene moved north Monday into Canada, leaving behind a path of destruction after raking the mid-Atlantic and northeast, where residents faced damaging floods triggered by hours of torrential rains.

While Irene's maximum wind speed might not compare with other legendary hurricanes, the storm had tremendous reach. A couple of days after it beat up on North Carolina, it still had enough strength to pummel Vermont and other parts of New England.

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Shots - Health Blog
10:01 pm
Sun August 28, 2011

Simple Things To Do To Lessen Back-To-School Stomach Bugs

Researchers have found that when bottles of sanitizer and wipes were kept around schools and students were cued to use them, they ended up missing significantly fewer days due to stomach bugs.
iStockphoto.com

As kids head back to class the dreaded back-to-school bugs begin to spike. Sniffles and sneezes are inevitable, but there are also stomach bugs.

And parents may never have considered how one part of the morning routine may increase their children's odds of getting an upset stomach. It's the packing of lunch with just typical foods.

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Shots - Health Blog
10:01 pm
Sun August 28, 2011

Think You're An Auditory Or Visual Learner? Scientists Say It's Unlikely

iStockphoto.com

We've all heard the theory that some students are visual learners, while others are auditory learners. And still other kids learn best when lessons involve movement.

But should teachers target instruction based on perceptions of students' strengths? Several psychologists say education could use some "evidence-based" teaching techniques, not unlike the way doctors try to use "evidence-based medicine."

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Crisis In The Housing Market
10:01 pm
Sun August 28, 2011

'Land Bank' Knocks Out Some Foreclosure Problems

LaMont Rump of Fez Enterprises guides an excavator during the demolition of a house in Cleveland.
Mhari Saito for NPR

Cities have been tearing down crumbling, vacant houses for decades. The money for municipal demolition bills usually comes out of city budgets, but in Cleveland the housing crisis has started to change that equation.

Bill Beavers has lived on Cleveland's Dove Street since 1967. But on a frecent sunny morning, Beavers is sitting on a neighbor's front porch, watching something he has never seen on his block before.

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Closing Walter Reed
10:01 pm
Sun August 28, 2011

Where Generations Of Soldiers Healed, And Moved On

Tyson Quink exercises at the National Naval Medical Center in Bethesda, MD. Quink, a former college football player, lost both of his legs three months into his deployment to Afghanistan.
Becky Lettenberger NPR

On a recent morning, John Pierce walked across the sprawling hospital campus of the Walter Reed Army Medical Center. On the lawn, he spotted people who have come to define the place in recent years.

"[They were] having physical fitness-type tests," Pierce says. "There were people with notebooks and things, like they record when you do your sit-ups and pushups — but these were a number of double amputees."

Pierce is the historian for the Walter Reed Society, which makes him an expert on the historic American hospital in Washington, D.C.

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Africa
3:33 pm
Sun August 28, 2011

Farrow Draws Attention To Plight Of African Refugees

Originally published on Mon August 29, 2011 5:34 am

In the Horn of Africa, 12 million people are in need of food aid because of the drought. The people of Somalia, facing both famine and war, are some of the hardest hit.

Many of those fleeing Somalia seek refuge in the southwest, at Kenya's giant Dadaab refugee camp. The settlement is about 50 miles from Kenya's border with Somalia. There are almost half a million Somalis in the camp – with more arriving every day.

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