World
11:40 am
Sat August 27, 2011

Is Libya The First 'True Arab Revolution?'

The Libyan rebels' takeover of Tripoli may be a landmark of the movement known as the Arab Spring, but does it qualify as a revolution?

James DeFronzo, author of the book Revolutions and Revolutionary Movements, thinks it's still too early to tell.

"You have to have some great structural, institutional change for an uprising to eventually be legitimately called a revolution," he tells weekends on All Things Considered guest host Laura Sullivan.

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Africa
11:23 am
Sat August 27, 2011

U.S. Aids Hunt For Gadhafi, Drawing On Iraq Lesson

A bullet-riddled mural portrait of Moammar Gadhafi sits on a wall in Tripoli. Libyan rebels are looking for the former leader, aided by foreign intelligence services and U.S. spy drones.
Francois Mori AP

It took a U.S.-led invasion force of more than 200,000 troops nine months to scour Iraq's nearly 170,000 square miles before they captured Saddam Hussein, in one of the largest manhunts ever.

Now, Moammar Gadhafi is on the run in Libya — but chasing after him is a much smaller and less well-equipped force of Libyan rebels. They're trying to track down a fugitive who, like Saddam, is well-armed, well-funded and capable of winning popular support and sowing instability simply by evading his pursuers.

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Africa
11:11 am
Sat August 27, 2011

In Libya, Gas Prices Rise As Rebels Seek Control

Rebel supporters burn books on the philosophy of Gadhafi in Tripoli on Saturday. Libyan rebel leaders say they're negotiating with regime loyalists in holdout towns.
Sergey Ponomarev AP

Originally published on Sat August 27, 2011 12:07 pm

Libyan rebels fought to gain control of a major supply road to Tripoli on Saturday, seizing a border crossing with Tunisia and strengthening their hold on the oil-rich country as they hunt for Moammar Gadhafi.

Controlling the road from the Tunisian border to the capital would help ease growing shortages of fuel and food, particularly in the battle-scarred city.

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The Two-Way
10:00 am
Sat August 27, 2011

First Irene-Related Deaths Reported

The first deaths in the U.S. related to Hurricane Irene to be reported come from North Carolina.

The Raleigh News & Observer writes that:

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Around the Nation
9:52 am
Sat August 27, 2011

Insurers Prepare For Flood Of Claims From Irene

Chris Pittman (left) and Frank Eckel board up a storefront in Cape May, N.J., in anticipation of Hurricane Irene.
William Thomas Cain Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 9:29 am

As Hurricane Irene makes its way north, insurance companies are scrambling to get claims adjusters and other personnel in place up and down the East Coast and into New England.

Companies will be assessing the damage once Irene is through battering the northeastern states. If the hurricane hits as wide an area as is predicted, insured losses could be in the billions of dollars.

On the boardwalk of Ocean City, Md., Tony Russo Jr. is boarding up the windows of his family's restaurant, Tony's Pizza.

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International correspondent Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson is based in Berlin and covers Central Europe for NPR. Her reports can be heard on NPR's award-winning programs including Morning Edition and All Things Considered.

She was previously based in Cairo and covered the Arab World for NPR from the Middle East to North Africa. Nelson returns to Egypt on occasion to cover the tumultuous transition to democracy there.

The Two-Way
7:40 am
Sat August 27, 2011

Mayor Bloomberg On Evacuations: 'You Have To Start Right Now'

Earlier today, a man pulled his luggage up Wall Street — one of the low-lying areas — in Manhattan.
Timothy A. Clary AFP/Getty Images

Hoping to convince anyone who is ignoring the mandatory evacuation orders for those living in New York City's low-lying areas, Mayor Michael Bloomberg just warned that if anyone hasn't already moved to higher ground, "you have to start right now."

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Economy
6:00 am
Sat August 27, 2011

A Prescription For The Bedridden Economy

At an annual economic symposium in Jackson Hole this week, Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke offered an upbeat assessment about the country's long-term prospects for economic growth. NPR's Scott Horsley talked with officials and academics at the symposium about economic growth in tight fiscal times.

Around the Nation
6:00 am
Sat August 27, 2011

New Jersey Shore Empties Ahead Of Irene

On the New Jersey Shore, officials have ordered mandatory evacuations and residents are preparing for the onslaught of Hurricane Irene. NPR's Jeff Brady reports.

Around the Nation
6:00 am
Sat August 27, 2011

Hurricane Flattens Business For OBX Pancake House

As Hurricane Irene swirls toward the North Carolina coast, many local business owners are despairing the loss of business during their busy season. Host Scott Simon checks in with Steve and Kristine Kiousis, who own the pancake house, Stack 'Em High, in Kitty Hawk, N.C.

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