NPR correspondent Chris Arnold is based in Boston. His reports are heard regularly on NPR's award-winning newsmagazines Morning Edition, All Things Considered and Weekend Edition. He joined NPR in 1996, and was based in San Francisco before moving to Boston in 2001.

The Two-Way
5:57 am
Mon August 8, 2011

Developing: In Wake Of S&P Downgrade, Watching The Markets

The markets are trying to digest a lot, this morning: First, is the news from Friday that Standard & Poor's downgraded the United States' credit rating. Second, is that this morning the European Central Bank started buying Italian and Spanish government bonds.

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Economy
4:34 am
Mon August 8, 2011

Economists Cast Opinions During Fishing Trip

Turmoil in the financial markets has coincided with an annual fishing trip for economists and top executives deep in the woods of Maine near the Canadian border. While the economists were together, Standard and Poor's took the unprecedented step of downgrading the U.S. government's credit rating.

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
1:30 am
Mon August 8, 2011

Baby's Palate And Food Memories Shaped Before Birth

Want your child to love veggies? Start early. Very early. Research shows that what a woman eats during pregnancy not only nourishes her baby in the womb, but may shape food preferences later in life.

At 21 weeks after conception, a developing baby weighs about as much as a can of coke – and he or she can taste it too. Still in the womb, the growing baby gulps down several ounces of amniotic fluid daily. That fluid surrounding the baby is actually flavored by the foods and beverages the mother has eaten in the last few hours.

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Living Large: Obesity In America
10:01 pm
Sun August 7, 2011

Big, Fat Stereotypes Play Out On The Small Screen

Jackie Gleason (right) played Ralph Kramden — a bumbling but loveable overweight husband — in the 1950s sitcom The Honeymooners. Audrey Meadows co-starred as his wife, Alice.
Paramount Pictures Getty Images

Originally published on Wed August 1, 2012 5:00 pm

Part of an ongoing series on obesity in America.

About the only thing all real fat people have in common is that they weigh more. Beyond that, they are as diverse in style, background and personality as people who aren't overweight. But on the small screen, fat people get shrunk into the same stereotypes.

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Your Health
10:01 pm
Sun August 7, 2011

Baby's Palate And Food Memories Shaped Before Birth

Mothers might not realize that the tastes and flavors they savor while pregnant can influence their babies' palates later.
Maggie Starbard/NPR

Want your child to love veggies? Start early. Very early. Research shows that what a woman eats during pregnancy not only nourishes her baby in the womb, but may shape food preferences later in life.

At 21 weeks after conception, a developing baby weighs about as much as a can of Coke — and he or she can taste it, too. Still in the womb, the growing baby gulps down several ounces of amniotic fluid daily. That fluid surrounding the baby is actually flavored by the foods and beverages the mother has eaten in the last few hours.

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Shots - Health Blog
10:01 pm
Sun August 7, 2011

Sleep-Deprived New Parents Don't Have To Hit The (Sleeping Pill) Bottle

Sleep researchers say parents of a new child can be a risk for long-term insomnia.
Timothy M. Black iStockphoto.com

Having a young child can wreak havoc on sleep patterns. So much so that sleep researchers say parents, and especially mothers, of a new child can be a risk for long-term insomnia.

There are the remedies parents whisper to each other on the playground: a spare bottle of Ambien, Tylenol PM or brandy. But for those looking for an un-medicated solution, Dr. Rafael Pelayo at Stanford University's Sleep Medicine Center has some ideas.

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Ina Jaffe is a National desk correspondent based at NPR West, NPR's production center in Culver City, Calif.

Covering California and the West, Jaffe has reported on nearly all of the major news events, elections, and natural disasters in the region. Currently, she covers issues related to aging. She also reports on regional and national politics, contributing election coverage in 2008, 2010, and 2012.

Research News
2:59 pm
Sun August 7, 2011

'Labs On A Chip' May Detect Diseases In The Field

Can the most modern of technologies help solve the health woes in the poorest countries in the world? Some biomedical engineers say yes. They are designing diagnostic laboratories that fit on something as small as a credit card, and give results in minutes instead of hours or days.

These devices are sometimes referred to as a "lab on a chip." To use them, all you need to do is obtain a drop of someone's blood.

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Politics
1:00 pm
Sun August 7, 2011

Downgrade Illustrates Washington's Dysfunction

Originally published on Mon August 8, 2011 4:24 am

When Standard & Poor's downgraded the United State's credit rating, it said that the "effectiveness, stability and predictability of American policymaking and political institutions have weakened." In other words, S&P was down on Washington's dysfunction, distrust and gridlock. The reactions to S&P's move — at least the reactions seen on TV — suggest that the ratings agency may have had a point.

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