Economy
7:15 am
Wed August 3, 2011

Private Hiring Up, But So Are Layoffs

Two reports sent mixed signals about the job market Wednesday.

Companies added 114,000 jobs in July, but job cuts rose to a 16-month high, according to two private reports. The numbers come two days before Friday's official July jobs report from the Labor Department.

Payroll processor ADP said employment in the services sector rose 121,000 last month, but goods-producing jobs fell by 7,000. The report "suggests that employment continued to advance at a moderate pace in July," but employment is decelerating, ADP said.

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The Two-Way
7:08 am
Wed August 3, 2011

ABC News: New D.B. Cooper Clues Come From 'Niece'

ABC News has a report out this morning that claims to name the source of the new information in the D.B. Cooper skyjacking. ABC says unnamed and unspecified sources have confirmed that a woman named Marla Cooper provided the FBI with a guitar strap for fingerprint testing.

NPR is trying to independently confirm ABC's claim. The FBI has yet to respond to a request for comment.

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The Two-Way
6:48 am
Wed August 3, 2011

Mubarak Trial Begins; Tropical Storm Emily Threatens East Coast

Egyptians walk past a poster of Egypt's ousted president Hosni Mubarak shown behind a noose outside the court set up in the Cairo Police Academy, on August 3.
Marwan Naamani AFP/Getty Images

Good morning!

The story dominating the morning is that six months after his ouster, former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak is standing trial on charges of corruption and complicity in the deaths of protesters. The ailing 83-year-old was in a hospital bed inside a metal cage. The AP reports:

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Opinion
6:41 am
Wed August 3, 2011

Weekly Standard: Yes, He's The Great Disuader

President Barack Obama walks out to deliver a statement in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, Tuesday, Aug. 2, 2011, following the Senate's passing of the debt ceiling agreement. The president's approval rating fell during this most recent economic debate.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

Mathew Continetti is an opinion editor for The Weekly Standard.

The talks were going nowhere. It was July 13, the fifth straight day of negotiations between President Obama and congressional leaders over an agreement to increase the debt ceiling. The hour was late when House majority leader Eric Cantor repeated the Republican preference for a short-term increase. But the president wasn't having it. "Eric, don't call my bluff," Obama said. "I'm going to the American people on this."

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Opinion
6:41 am
Wed August 3, 2011

New Republic: For GOP It's A Far-Right Turn Only

As the Tea Party's presence in the political spectrum grows, some are wondering if the GOP will be forced away from the center.
iStockphoto.com

Ed Kilgore is a special correspondent for The New Republic.

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The Two-Way
6:21 am
Wed August 3, 2011

Local New Jersey Politician Resigns Amid Sexting Scandal

Louis N. Magazzu.
Cumberland County

Yet another politician has given up his seat because explicit pictures of themselves ended up on the World Wide Web and in this case on the site of a political adversary.

Louis N. Magazzu, 53-year-old Democrat, had been a New Jersey freeholder, or county commissioner, for nearly 14 years. He resigned, yesterday, amid a controversy that's becoming very familiar: Magazzu texted naked pictures of himself to a woman he'd never met in person and then those pictures went public.

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The Two-Way
5:40 am
Wed August 3, 2011

Joining Fitch, Moody's Also Affirms U.S. Credit Rating

Echoing what Fitch Ratings said yesterday, Moody's Investor Service said it is keeping a triple-A credit rating for the United States. Bloomberg reports that the announcement also came with a warning that a downgrade is still possible if the country doesn't take on debt reduction:

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Renee Montagne is co-host of NPR's Morning Edition, the most widely heard radio news program in the U.S. She has hosted the newsmagazine since 2004, broadcasting from NPR West in Culver City, California, with co-host Steve Inskeep in NPR's Washington, D.C. headquarters.

Montagne is a familiar voice on NPR, having reported and hosted since the mid-1980s. She hosted All Things Considered with Robert Siegel for two years in the late 1980s, and previously worked for NPR's Science, National and Foreign desks.

Rachel Martin is the host of Weekend Edition Sunday.

Tom Gjelten covers a wide variety of global security and economic issues for NPR News. He brings to that assignment many years covering international news from posts in Washington and around the world.

Gjelten's overseas reporting experience includes stints in Mexico City as NPR's Latin America correspondent from 1986 to 1990 and in Berlin as Central Europe correspondent from 1990 to 1994. During those years, he covered the wars in Nicaragua, El Salvador, Guatemala, and Colombia, as well as the Gulf War of 1990-1991 and the wars in Croatia and Bosnia.

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