The Two-Way
7:49 am
Tue August 2, 2011

FBI Reveals More About New Possible Skyjack Suspect

An undated FBI sketch of D.B. Cooper.
AFP/Getty Images

As we reported yesterday, the FBI jump-started D.B. Cooper mania with its revelation it has a new suspect in the unsolved skyjacking that occurred 40 years ago this November.

New details continue to trickle out with each interview with FBI Special Agent Fred Gutt. Among the new bits of information about the man who may or may not prove to be D.B. Cooper:

-- The "suspect" died more than 10 years ago of natural causes

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The Two-Way
7:30 am
Tue August 2, 2011

FAA Shutdown Could Cost $1.2 Billion

Construction crews working on a new FAA air traffic control tower at Oakland International Airport were told last Friday to stop working after the U.S. House of Representatives refused to reauthorize routine funding of the FAA.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Tue August 2, 2011 12:24 pm

After last night's vote on the debt ceiling compromise, the House adjourned for the summer but left nearly 4,000 Federal Aviation Administration employees, who have been furloughed because of a funding impasse, in limbo.

Reuters reports that because of the House recess and the fact that a compromise in the Senate faltered last night, it is now near certain that the FAA could be shut down through August.

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Opinion
7:20 am
Tue August 2, 2011

The Nation: Sports Don't Need Sex To Sell

Lindsey Vonn, of the United States, speeds down the course during the first run of an alpine ski, World Cup women's giant slalom, in Arber-Zwiesel, Germany, Sunday, Feb. 6, 2011. Defending champion Vonn finished outside the top 10.
Alessandro Trovati AP

Mary Jo Kane is the director of the Tucker Center for Research on Girls and Women in Sport at the University of Minnesota.

"The newest kid on the women's sports block is finding that the old formula for attention-getting is as robust as ever. 'Sex sells,' says Atlanta Beat defender Nancy Augustyniak, who was astonished to learn she finished third in a Playboy.com poll of the sexiest female soccer players." — Wendy Parker, Atlanta Journal-Constitution

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Opinion
6:49 am
Tue August 2, 2011

Foreign Policy: Influencing A Murderer's Manifesto

Two young women stand in silence after placing flower near Sundvollen close to the Utoya island, near Oslo, Norway, Tuesday, July 26, 2011, where a gunman Anders Behring Breivik killed at least 68 people. The defense lawyer for the man who confessed to the mass killings told The Associated Press on Tuesday that there's no way his client will walk free and is likely insane.
Ferdinand Ostrop AP

Phillip Longman, a fellow at the New America Foundation, is author of The Empty Cradle: Why Falling Birthrates Threaten World Prosperity and What to Do About It.

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Opinion
6:43 am
Tue August 2, 2011

New Republic: Capitulate In Debt Debate? Not Clinton

President Clinton, accompanied by sixth grade students from Thomas Jefferson Middle School in Arlington, Va., gestures while speaking in the Oval Office of the White House Monday Dec. 18, 1995 after vetoing two spending bills. With negotiators mired in a broader budget debate, the president vetoed the bills arguing they would undermine the nation's environment.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Kara Brandeisky is an intern at The New Republic.

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Opinion
6:43 am
Tue August 2, 2011

Weekly Standard: Going Forward, Five Fiscal Lessons

Tax hikes and spending cuts are one of the most contentious parts of the budget debate in Washington.
iStockphoto.com

Fred Barnes is the executive editor for The Weekly Standard.

We've learned a lot from the fight to attach spending cuts to the debt limit increase. Here are five of the lessons:

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The Two-Way
6:42 am
Tue August 2, 2011

Deepening Crisis In Somalia; Crackdown Continues In Syria

Good morning!

As we wrote earlier, the big news of the day is the debt ceiling compromise that's making its way through Congress. We'll be following that story throughout the day, but here are some other headlines:

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The Two-Way
6:00 am
Tue August 2, 2011

Amid Grumbling From Both Sides, Senate Scheduled To Vote On Debt Deal

House Majority Leader Eric Cantor (R-VA) speaks with reporters after the House voted to raise the debt ceiling.
Win McNamee Getty Images

After the House passed the debt ceiling deal with a surprising lopsided 269-161 vote, yesterday, the Senate is scheduled to vote on the bill at noon, today. If it passes, it heads to the president's desk and with a signature the debt ceiling is immediately raised by $400 billion. And it would all happen just hours before the day the Treasury said the country would run out of money.

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Politics
5:37 am
Tue August 2, 2011

After 15 Years, GOP Revives Balanced Budget Idea

Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole on Capitol Hill on March 1, 1995 after he came up one vote short in his quest to pass a balanced budget amendment in the Senate.
John Duricka ASSOCIATED PRESS

It's an idea whose time may have come again.

There was lively debate about amending the Constitution to require a balanced budget throughout much of the 1980s and 1990s, but the issue seemed to die off in the face of the federal surpluses that marked the end of the Clinton years.

"The reason it fell off the radar screen then is we actually did it," says Robert S. Walker, who served on the House Budget Committee as a Pennsylvania Republican during the Clinton administration. "We simply said, look, if it's not possible to pass the amendment, let's balance the budget."

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Christopher Joyce is a correspondent on the science desk at NPR. His stories can be heard on all of NPR's news programs, including NPR's Morning Edition, All Things Considered, and Weekend Edition.

Joyce seeks out stories in some of the world's most inaccessible places. He has reported from remote villages in the Amazon and Central American rainforests, Tibetan outposts in the mountains of western China, and the bottom of an abandoned copper mine in Michigan's Upper Peninsula. Over the course of his career, Joyce has written stories about volcanoes, hurricanes, human evolution, tagging giant blue-fin tuna, climate change, wars in Kosovo and Iraq and the artificial insemination of an African elephant.

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