NPR News

Pages

The Two-Way
6:45 am
Mon March 5, 2012

4.0 Magnitude Quake Rattles San Francisco

For those who just felt the earth shake in Northern California, the U.S. Geological Survey says there was a 4.0 magnitude temblor in the "San Francisco bay area" at 5:33 a.m. local time (8:33 a.m. ET).

There's no word yet on whether there was much, if any, damage.

The USGS says the quake was centered about 1 mile from El Cerrito, Calif.

Read more
The Two-Way
6:34 am
Mon March 5, 2012

Putin's Victory Comes With Claims Of 'Widespread Violations'

Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin at a rally in Moscow on Sunday. He won election to the post he previously held: president.
Alexei Nikolsky AFP/Getty Images

It's no surprise that Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin won Sunday's election to return to the more powerful post he previously held — president. His victory was widely expected. Putin appears to have gotten about two-thirds of the votes.

Also not surprising: Sunday's results are being followed with reports today that, as The Associated Press says, "the opposition and independent observers insisted the vote had been marred by widespread violations."

Read more
The Two-Way
5:55 am
Mon March 5, 2012

Update: Limbaugh Loses Ninth Advertiser Over Comments About Law Student

Rush Limbaugh.
Ron Edmonds AP

Originally published on Mon March 5, 2012 4:10 pm

Update at 6:08 p.m. ET. USA Today's On Politics blog reports that both Sears and Allstate are distancing themselves from Limbaugh as well. Both firms said their media buying firms bought space on the show, today, but they have instructed them not to continue.

Read more
Around the Nation
5:31 am
Mon March 5, 2012

Michigan Moviegoer Sues Over High Snack Prices

Originally published on Fri March 9, 2012 8:51 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. Joshua Thompson is a big moviegoer, but high prices at the concession stand left a bad taste in his mouth. So after paying $8 for a Coke and a box of Goobers, Thompson filed a class action lawsuit. It accuses Michigan's AMC Theaters of charging grossly excessive prices for snacks. Consumer lawyers told the Detroit Free Press the lawsuit will likely be a flop, but moviegoers are applauding. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright National Public Radio.

The Two-Way
5:30 am
Mon March 5, 2012

Toddler's Death Brings Toll From Latest Tornadoes To 39

In Henryville, Ind., on Sunday, Janet Clark stood outside what remains of her home, which was destroyed in Friday's tornado.
Scott Olson Getty Images

Originally published on Mon March 5, 2012 5:33 am

  • Erica Peterson reporting on 'Morning Edition'

There's more sad news from the stretch of five states across the Midwest and South that were slammed by tornadoes on Friday.

Read more
Europe
5:17 am
Mon March 5, 2012

Saint's Heart Stolen From Dublin Cathedral

Originally published on Fri March 9, 2012 8:51 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Sports
5:02 am
Mon March 5, 2012

70-Year-Old Japanese Equestrian Wins Olympic Spot

Originally published on Fri March 9, 2012 8:51 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Now, we do not know what songs make Hiroshi Hoketsu move, but the Japanese equestrian does move gracefully on a horse. Just shy of his 71st birthday, he has won a spot at the London Olympics for dressage, where you lead a horse through a series of very precise movements. Japanese officials are still deciding whether they'll let him compete.

Read more
Three Books...
5:00 am
Mon March 5, 2012

Try And Try Again: 3 Tales Of Spectacular Failure

Anna1975 flickr.com

Originally published on Tue March 6, 2012 5:19 pm

Don't let the theme fool you. These three books are anything but failures. They are, in fact, full of sharply rendered and utterly original characters who fail spectacularly in their attempts to do right (or what they think is right). They are men on a mission, variously heroic, harebrained, heartfelt, even cruel, but their good intentions are undeniable, if not always admirable.

Read more
Asia
2:00 am
Mon March 5, 2012

China's National People's Opens Annual Session

Originally published on Fri March 9, 2012 8:51 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Now just as the U.S. economy seems to be picking up, China's is not. The Chinese government has downgraded its economic growth target to the slowest rate in eight years. China's premier says the country needs to boost consumer demand, and address what he calls unsustainable development.

NPR's Louisa Lim reports from Beijing.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

Read more
Law
2:00 am
Mon March 5, 2012

Deal Reached On Gulf Oil Spill Victims

Originally published on Fri March 9, 2012 8:51 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Lawyers for BP, and thousands of people affected by the Deepwater Horizon accident and oil spill, had been expected, for a long time, to be in a New Orleans courtroom this morning for a civil trial. Instead, they're reviewing a deal to settle the case.

BP estimates it would pay nearly $8 billion in the settlement. In exchange, the company would avoid revisiting, in a courtroom, what led up to the drilling rig explosion that killed 11 men and poured massive amounts of oil into the Gulf of Mexico.

Read more
Business
2:00 am
Mon March 5, 2012

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Fri March 9, 2012 8:51 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And today's last word in business is a blast from the past: Datsun, a name that you may remember if you're of a certain age. The cut-priced Japanese cars first appeared in the United States in 1958, when Elvis topped the charts. Datsun was produced by Nissan, which decided to phase out the brand in the 1980s. Now a Japanese newspaper says Nissan may bring it back.

Sadly, American Datsun enthusiasts may have to travel far to find one. Nissan's plans to sell low-priced cars only in emerging markets like India and Russia.

Around the Nation
2:00 am
Mon March 5, 2012

Tornado Destroys Only School In Henryville, Ind.

Originally published on Fri March 9, 2012 8:51 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The death toll from the tornados that slammed Midwestern and Southern states on Friday has now risen to 39. The latest victim is Angel Babcock, 15 months old. She died on Sunday in a hospital in Louisville, Kentucky. The toddler was found in the shattered remains of her family's home. Her parents and two siblings were also killed.

Read more
Business
2:00 am
Mon March 5, 2012

Business News

Originally published on Fri March 9, 2012 8:51 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with more bad news for News Corp.

An FBI investigation of Rupert Murdoch's media company is now looking to Russia. A billboard company, News Outdoor Russia, owned until last year by News Corp, is being scrutinized over possibly bribing public officials. The FBI began looking into News Corps' operations after its British newspapers were embroiled in a bribery and phone hacking scandal.

Shots - Health Blog
1:44 am
Mon March 5, 2012

Pet Therapy: How Animals And Humans Heal Each Other

Ryan Shank-Rowe, 9, takes part in a therapeutic riding program at Little Full Cry Farm in Clifton, Va., last month.
Maggie Starbard NPR

Originally published on Fri March 9, 2012 8:51 am

Those of us who own pets know they make us happy. But a growing body of scientific research is showing that our pets can also make us healthy, or healthier.

That helps explain the increasing use of animals — dogs and cats mostly, but also birds, fish and even horses — in settings ranging from hospitals and nursing homes to schools, jails and mental institutions.

Read more
Business
1:41 am
Mon March 5, 2012

Are Tax Breaks The Right Move For Manufacturing?

A welder at Specialty Fab in North Lima, Ohio, works March 1 on a piece of a compressor skid frame that is bound for the Ohio Shale project. Manufacturing companies such as Specialty Fab could receive tax breaks if a proposal from the Obama administration goes through.
Jim Watson AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri March 9, 2012 8:51 am

The White House says restoring the U.S. manufacturing sector is an essential part of getting the economy back on track.

GOP candidate Rick Santorum wants to see tax breaks for manufacturing companies, and the Obama administration proposed something similar last week. But economists say tax breaks may not be the best way to help manufacturers right now.

Over the years, the steady loss of good factory jobs is a big reason why wages have stagnated for people who never went to college, says Dean Baker, co-director of the Center for Economic and Policy Research.

Read more
Shots - Health Blog
1:40 am
Mon March 5, 2012

Inconsistency: The Real Hobgoblin

Republican presidential candidates Rick Santorum and Mitt Romney clashed often during Wednesday's GOP debate.
Jae C. Hong AP

Originally published on Mon March 5, 2012 2:03 am

This campaign season, inconsistency seems to be, well, almost everywhere. Each flip-flopping politician revels in pointing out the flip-flopping ways of his opponents.

Why are politicians and those of us who vote for them so obsessed with inconsistency? We take that question on from three angles: how our brains are wired; the psychology of judging what's consistent; and how consistency plays out in leadership styles.

Jon Hamilton: Why Our Brains Hate A Flip-Flopper

Read more
Around the Nation
10:01 pm
Sun March 4, 2012

Districts Still Unsettled As New York Primary Nears

Pedestrians walk along a section of Jamaica Avenue in Woodhaven, Queens, New York. The neighborhood is part of an area targeted for congressional redistricting, but the process is still dragging on as the state's primary draws near.
Bebeto Matthews AP

Originally published on Fri March 9, 2012 8:51 am

By now, most states around the country have redrawn their political boundaries based on the 2010 census — and then there's New York.

For voters in the Forest Hills section of Queens, it has been rough. A year ago, they were represented by Democrat Anthony Weiner, who tweeted his way to infamy. Now, they're represented by Republican Bob Turner, who won a special election after Weiner resigned.

Right now, nobody even knows what district they're in.

Read more
Music News
7:19 pm
Sun March 4, 2012

Jazzercizing To 'It's Raining Men'? Hallelujah!

Jazzercizers in action.
Jazzercize, Inc.

Read more
Presidential Race
3:03 pm
Sun March 4, 2012

1 Of Tuesday's 10: GOP Candidates Vie For Ohio Bump

Republican presidential candidate, former US Senator Rick Santorum speaks to the Lake County Republican Party during their Lincoln Day dinner in Willoughby, Ohio on Friday.
Jim Watson AFP/Getty Images

Ohio is one of 10 states holding contests to pick their party's presidential nominee on Super Tuesday, but it has been the main focus of attention for GOP candidates because it will be a major battleground state in the general election this November.

The conventional wisdom has been that whoever takes Ohio in the general election goes on to win the White House, which gives Tuesday's contest a lot of potential momentum for the eventual winner.

Read more
Author Interviews
2:43 pm
Sun March 4, 2012

They're Nobody And Want To Know Everything

Two mysterious men pull up to the courthouse and head to the public records office. They're strangers, and they ask a lot of strange questions like, "I'd like to look at Mayor John Doe's property deeds." Or, "I want to see Congressman Smith's voting records."

Read more
Around the Nation
2:10 pm
Sun March 4, 2012

(Sock) Monkey Business: A Festival For Iconic Toy

Sock Monkeys at the 8th annual Sock Monkey Madness Festival in Rockford, Ill.
Jenna Dooley WNIJ

Adele Jedynak makes monkey sounds to a group of kids who are steps away from playing Sock Monkey bowling and plush-primate parachuting. It's all part of the Sock Monkey Madness Festival, the eighth annual festival dedicated to the sock monkey in Rockford, Ill.

Read more
Science
2:08 pm
Sun March 4, 2012

Meteorite Hunter Scours The Ground For Bits Of Sky

One of Ruben Garcia's favorite spots to go meteorite hunting is an enormous dry lake bed in southern Arizona.
Courtesy Jana Becker

Originally published on Sun March 4, 2012 5:03 pm

Every so often, pieces of heaven crash into Earth.

They can come from our own solar system, or millions of light years away. Few of us are lucky enough to get our hands on one of these space rocks. But for meteorite hunters and dealers such as Ruben Garcia, touching a piece of outer space is a daily routine.

The Best Hunting Grounds

One of Garcia's favorite spots to go meteorite hunting is an enormous dry lake bed in southern Arizona.

Read more
Author Interviews
12:25 pm
Sun March 4, 2012

A Road Trip In Search Of America's Lost Languages

Trip of the Tongue cover detail
Bloomsbury Publishing

Originally published on Mon March 5, 2012 11:38 am

The vast majority of the 175 indigenous languages still spoken in the United States are on the verge of extinction.

Linguist Elizabeth Little spent two years driving all over the country looking for the few remaining pockets where those languages are still spoken — from the scores of Native American tongues, to the Creole of Louisiana. The resulting book is Trip of the Tongue: Cross-Country Travels in Search of America's Lost Languages.

Read more
Around the Nation
12:13 pm
Sun March 4, 2012

A Hollywood Writer's Second Act: Gongs

Comedy writer Andrew Borakove left California for Lincoln, Neb., to sell gongs.
Guy Raz

Originally published on Thu March 8, 2012 1:22 pm

There's a Mystery Machine sitting outside Andrew Borakove's nondescript warehouse on a quiet street in Lincoln, Neb.

"I can never be depressed driving around town, because there's always some 4-year-old waving to me manically," Borakove says.

The mystery about the Scooby Doo replica van starts to fade, however, once you notice the bumper stickers on the back. Black background, white font, like a "Got Milk?" ad: "Happiness Is a Warm Gong." "Gongs, Not Bongs." "My Child Is an Honor Gong Player."

Read more
Europe
9:04 am
Sun March 4, 2012

Financial Woes Keep Spanish Airport Grounded

Spanish politicians spent $220 million on the sparkling new Castellon airport on Spain's Mediterranean coast — $40 million alone was spent on TV ads and other marketing. They also paid $600,000 for ferrets and falcons to kill birds that endanger aircraft.

Yet no plane has yet taken off. Construction, which began in 2004, went over budget, partly to fund a 75-foot statue of a local politician out front.

Read more
The Two-Way
8:14 am
Sun March 4, 2012

Eric Cantor Endorses Mitt Romney

GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney received a key endorsement Sunday morning when House Majority Leader Eric Cantor of Virginia endorsed Romney on NBC's Meet the Press.

Cantor cited the economy as the top issue of the campaign.

"What I have seen is a very hard-fought primary. And we have seen now that the central issue about the campaign now is the economy," Cantor said. "I just think there's one candidate in the case who can do that, and it's Mitt Romney."

Read more
World
6:00 am
Sun March 4, 2012

Obama To AIPAC: Israel's Security 'Non-Negotiable'

Originally published on Sun March 11, 2012 7:02 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin.

(SOUNDBITE OF THE PRESIDENTIAL MARCH)

Read more
Middle East
6:00 am
Sun March 4, 2012

Between The U.S., Israel And Iran, Who Blinks First?

When President Obama meets with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu Monday, he is expected to try to convince Netanyahu to put off any plans his government may have to attack Iran's nuclear facilities. Host Rachel Martin speaks with Martin Indyk, director of the Foreign Policy Program at the Brookings Institution and a former U.S. ambassador to Israel.

Around the Nation
6:00 am
Sun March 4, 2012

Storms Mangle Ky. Town; Community Comes Together

Residents in parts of the Midwest and South are recovering from a wave of deadly and destructive tornados and storms. Host Rachel Martin speaks with Pastor B.J. Donahue of Piner Baptist Church in Piner, Ky., who describes what his town looks like now.

Europe
6:00 am
Sun March 4, 2012

French Head To The Slopes For Winter Break

Paris has become a virtual ghost town as families vacate the city for two weeks of ski holiday, a time-honored ritual the French seem disinclined to give up. NPR's Eleanor Beardsley reports.

Pages