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Shots - Health Blog
2:03 pm
Tue January 10, 2012

Study: A Joint May Be Easier On Lungs Than A Cigarette

Smoking marijuana has just got to be bad for the lungs, since it's been made abundantly clear that cigarettes wreak havoc. Or so it would seem.

But the record on marijuana and lung health has been confusing at best. The latest study is typical: It shows that pot smokers' lung function actually improves, at least if they're not smoking a lot.

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The Salt
1:51 pm
Tue January 10, 2012

How To Get Kids To Eat Apples? Make Them Taste Like Grape Candy

Is the Grapple a healthy snack or just a step away from candy?
Grapple

There is no escaping artificial flavor. It's everywhere, and the people who invent it argue that it will enhance your experience of a food — making it more tropical, more floral, or more bitter, in a good way.

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Business
1:38 pm
Tue January 10, 2012

The Optimists' Turn: EU's Crisis May Not Be So Bad

A woman checks stock indexes of a bank in Milan. Some analysts say the turmoil in Europe may actually help the U.S. economy.
Luca Bruno AP

Originally published on Tue January 10, 2012 2:25 pm

Europe's debt crisis is a huge threat to the U.S. economy. Or is it?

For many months, economists have been warning that Europe's debt troubles could spiral into a massive recession that drags down U.S. growth.

But some analysts say those fears may be wildly exaggerated. The U.S. economy has been "decoupling" from Europe for some time, and wouldn't be significantly harmed by any recession taking shape over there, they argue.

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The Two-Way
1:35 pm
Tue January 10, 2012

Ga. Parents, NAACP Demand Teacher's Firing Over 'Slave' Math Problem

The debate over a math problem at a Georgia elementary school intensified today with parents protesting and the Georgia NAACP calling for the teacher who wrote the math problem to be fired.

At issue is a third-grade worksheet that included references to slaves filling baskets with cotton and this question: "If Frederick got two beatings per day, how many beatings did he get in one week? Two weeks?"

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It's All Politics
1:19 pm
Tue January 10, 2012

Door-To-Door In N.H., Mormon Youth Get 1 Question: 'Huntsman Or Romney'?

Former Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman makes his way through the media as he leaves a polling station in Manchester, N.H. on Jan. 10. He's one of the candidates two young Mormons are often asked about as they proselytize.
ADAM HUNGER Reuters /Landov

If campaigning for Republican presidential candidates in New Hampshire sounds like hard work, try going door-to-door before the primary — for Jesus. Ike Sriskandarajah of TurnStyleNews.com, a production of Youth Radio, spoke with two Mormon missionaries in Exeter, N.H., to hear how they ride the line between proselytizing and politics.

As Sriskandarajah reports on All Things Considered Tuesday, most canvassers wear candidates' buttons and carry campaign signs.

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Shots - Health Blog
1:10 pm
Tue January 10, 2012

To Understand Health Overhaul, Try A Comic Book

Kaiser Health News

Health care reform is no laughing matter, but MIT economist Jonathan Gruber's new comic book on the subject aims to communicate some pretty complicated policy details in a way that, if not exactly side-splitting, is at least engaging.

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NPR Story
1:00 pm
Tue January 10, 2012

Court Strikes Down Okla. Sharia Ban

A federal court has ruled that Oklahoma cannot implement a state ban on Islamic Sharia law. The 10th Circuit Court of Appeals upheld a previous ruling blocking Oklahoma's Sharia ban.

NPR Story
1:00 pm
Tue January 10, 2012

Elving Discusses N.H. Primary

Melissa Block talks with NPR senior Washington editor Ron Elving about Tuesday's first-in-the-nation New Hampshire primary.

NPR Story
1:00 pm
Tue January 10, 2012

What To Expect From The N.H. Primary

After months of campaigning and millions of dollars in TV ads, the first presidential primary is Tuesday in New Hampshire. Audie Cornish talks with NPR's national political correspondent Mara Liasson about what to expect when the results roll in.

Law
1:00 pm
Tue January 10, 2012

Panel Recommends Paying Eugenics Victims $50,000

Originally published on Tue January 10, 2012 8:47 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

More than half of states had forced sterilization programs at one time, but few were as aggressive as North Carolina's. Some 7,600 men, women and children were sterilized by that state's eugenics board up to the mid 1970s. Sterilization was seen as a way to control welfare costs and improve the caliber of the population. Well, today, a task force in North Carolina took a step toward becoming the only state to offer compensation to eugenics victims.

From member station WFAE, Julie Rose has the story.

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Law
1:00 pm
Tue January 10, 2012

High Court Hears Arguments In FCC Case

Singer Cher accepts a lifetime achievement award at the MGM Grand Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas during the Billboard Music Awards show in 2002. Her use of an obscenity in her acceptance speech led the FCC to fine broadcaster Fox.
Joe Cavaretta AP

Originally published on Tue January 10, 2012 9:01 pm

The U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments Tuesday testing the constitutionality of a Bush-era regulation that allows the Federal Communications Commission to punish broadcasters with stiff fines for the fleeting use of vulgar language or nude images. The FCC's rule applies only to radio and over-the-air TV networks — like Fox, ABC, NBC and PBS — but not to cable TV.

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National Security
1:00 pm
Tue January 10, 2012

Army Scraps Most Of The JTRS Program

Originally published on Tue January 10, 2012 8:47 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

Now a story about the challenges of military communication on the battlefield.

(SOUNDBITE OF RADIO COMMUNICATION)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: Roger, stand by. I believe (unintelligible) trying to push traffic for you.

BLOCK: This is radio traffic from an Army convoy in eastern Afghanistan that's having trouble communicating.

(SOUNDBITE OF RADIO COMMUNICATION)

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Around the Nation
1:00 pm
Tue January 10, 2012

A Unique Expression Of Love For Math

Originally published on Mon March 31, 2014 3:37 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Last week in Boston, 7,000 mathematicians, math teachers and math enthusiasts from all over the world converged for something called the Joint Mathematics Meeting. Naturally, there was a lot of this...

UNIDENTIFIED MAN 2: C plus S minus two.

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: Well, S is A plus B and C is two.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN 2: Right.

BLOCK: But reporter Ari Daniel Shapiro also found a lot that he wasn't expecting.

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Presidential Race
1:00 pm
Tue January 10, 2012

How Important Is N.H. To Romney's Campaign?

Originally published on Tue January 10, 2012 8:47 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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Presidential Race
1:00 pm
Tue January 10, 2012

NPR Correspondents Discuss N.H. Primary

Audie Cornish and Melissa Block talk to NPR correspondents covering the New Hampshire primary. NPR's Don Gonyea is covering the campaign of former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum. NPR's Robert Smith is covering the campaign of Texas Rep. Ron Paul. NPR's Tovia Smith is covering the campaign of former Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman. And NPR's Andrea Seabrook is covering the campaign of former House Speaker Newt Gingrich.

Asia
1:00 pm
Tue January 10, 2012

South Korea Takes A Political Turn To The Left

When the current president of South Korea Lee Myung-bak took office four years ago, he turned a cold shoulder to engagement with North Korea. The conservative wing in South Korea opposed improving relations with Pyongyang. But that has proven to be an unpopular policy, and now Lee finds himself in the difficult position of appealing for closer ties in this unpredictable transition period in North Korea. Lee goes to Beijing Monday to seek Chinese backing for this policy shift.

The Two-Way
12:27 pm
Tue January 10, 2012

Israeli Bill Would Make It A Crime To Use Nazi Comparisons

In Israel, it might become a crime to use Nazi comparisons to criticize someone. As the AP puts it, a bill under consideration by parliament would "would impose penalties of up to six months in jail and a $25,000 fine for using the word 'Nazi' or Holocaust symbols for purposes other than teaching, documentation or research."

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All Tech Considered
12:05 pm
Tue January 10, 2012

Can Two Smartphone Also-Rans Rescue Each Other?

Nokia President and CEO Stephen Elop introduces the Lumia 900 smartphone during a CES news conference in Las Vegas.
Julie Jacobson AP

Originally published on Tue October 16, 2012 2:37 pm

Not too long ago Nokia was the largest tech company in Europe. Its market cap rivaled Microsoft's. It helped create the mobile phone industry as we know it. But the emergence of a new generation of smartphones — led by Apple's iPhone and Android-based offerings from Samsung, HTC and others — left Nokia behind.

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Asia
12:01 pm
Tue January 10, 2012

In India, The Pressure Cooker Of College Admissions

Competition for admission to India's top school, Delhi University, is particularly fierce. Here students fill out forms at the Arts Faculty in New Delhi, India, on June 21.
Tsering Topgyal AP

Originally published on Wed January 11, 2012 8:41 am

This can be a harrowing time for high school seniors and their parents in the U.S. as they wait to hear from college admissions offices. But the pressure can be equally intense, if not more so in India, where the massive number of applicants and one make-or-break exam keeps students on edge.

Admission to Delhi University, one of India's most prestigious schools, is considered as tough, if not tougher than the process at many leading schools in the U.S.

"It's a very difficult game, given the numbers," says Dinesh Singh, the vice chancellor of Delhi University.

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The Two-Way
12:01 pm
Tue January 10, 2012

Georgia Will Merge Eight Colleges To Save Money

Eight colleges in Georgia will now become four, the State Board of Regents announced today. The move wil affect about 36,000 students and was proposed in an effort to save money.

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Shots - Health Blog
11:56 am
Tue January 10, 2012

Binge Drinking: Risky And Widespread

A man who has five drinks or more at one sitting is bingeing.
iStockphoto.com

Binge drinking in America looks to be an even bigger problem than we thought.

About 1 in 6 Americans, or 17 percent of the population, went on at least one drinking binge in a month last year, according to the latest figures from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. That works out to 38 million people.

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The Two-Way
10:59 am
Tue January 10, 2012

Panel Says N.C. Should Pay $50K To Victims Of Forced Sterilization

The victims of a North Carolina program that forcibly sterilized thousands of people should receive $50,000 in compensation, a task force said Tuesday. The AP writes that this is first time, the state tries to make up for a eugenics program that ran from the 1930s until 1977.

Before any payments are made, however, the state Legislature must approve the panel's recommendation.

The AP reports:

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Election 2012
10:45 am
Tue January 10, 2012

In N.H., Romney's Real Rival May Be Expectation

Former Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman, who was stumping at Harvey's Bakery in Dover, N.H., is pinning his hopes on a strong finish in the Granite State.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Primary Day in New Hampshire turned into open season as GOP rivals launched a barrage of attacks seeking to undermine front-runner Mitt Romney, whose campaign hopes to live up to expectations that he will deliver a solid victory.

Not only does Romney need to win, he needs to win convincingly — holding challengers such as Rick Santorum, Ron Paul, Newt Gingrich and a resurgent Jon Huntsman comfortably at arm's length.

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The Salt
9:48 am
Tue January 10, 2012

X-Rays Scan Foods For The Secret Ingredient That Could Break A Tooth

Costco has pushed vendors to X-ray food to find "foreign objects" like metal and stones before they reach consumers.
Rick Bowmer ASSOCIATED PRESS

Originally published on Wed January 11, 2012 7:44 am

I don't know about you, but when I spoon into store-bought ice cream or chomp into hot dogs, I don't consider it a risky activity, one that could land me in the dentist's chair with a broken tooth. But it turns out that this does happen. Even Costco, the giant warehouse retailer, says it's true.

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Television
9:35 am
Tue January 10, 2012

A New 'Morning' On CBS, But Will It Work?

CBS This Morning is co-hosted by Charlie Rose, Gayle King and Erica Hill.
John P. Filo CBS

There are three new hosts of CBS This Morning, which was unveiled yesterday. One is Erica Hill, a holdover from The Early Show, the previous program in the early-morning time slot. Another is Gayle King, still best known as Oprah Winfrey's best friend, who's here to handle most of the entertainment interviews. And the third, the pivot point, is Charlie Rose, brought over from PBS to give this new show an injection of instant respectability and seriousness.

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The Two-Way
9:31 am
Tue January 10, 2012

Cupcakes Are OK; Cupcakes In A Jar Won't Fly Past Security, Says TSA

TSA

The Transportation Security Administration clarified its cupcake policy in a blog post. Cupcakegate — as the agency has termed it — was prompted in December, when TSA officers told Rebecca Hains, who was flying out of Las Vegas, she could not carry cupcakes in her carry-on luggage. The TSA said the icing on the two cupcakes was a security risk.

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Shots - Health Blog
9:25 am
Tue January 10, 2012

Nicotine Patches Up Early Memory Loss In Study

Franck Camhi iStockphoto.com

Slapping on a nicotine patch may not just be for smokers trying to kick the habit.

In an intriguing test, researchers tried nicotine patches as a memory booster for nonsmokers with mild declines in their thinking ability, a precursor to dementia or Alzheimer's disease.

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Books
8:57 am
Tue January 10, 2012

Michelle And Barack Obama: A Powerful Partnership

Jodi Kantor spoke to over 200 sources, including White House aides and close friends of the President, while reseaching her new biography on the Obamas. Kantor is a Washington correspondent for The New York Times.
Juliana Sohn Courtesy of the author

In late 2006, Barack Obama held a meeting with his wife Michelle and his advisors to weigh whether he should run for President.

"And Michelle Obama, in front of everybody, asks her husband a very dramatic question," says New York Times Washington correspondent Jodi Kantor. "She says, 'What do you think you can bring to this that the other candidates can't?'"

Her husband paused for a second, and then responded, "I really think if I became President, it would inspire people all over the world to think of new possibilities."

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The Two-Way
8:45 am
Tue January 10, 2012

Mine Disaster Settlement Talks Enter Fifth Day

The emotionally charged task of putting price tags on the lives of coal miners killed in the nation's deadliest mine disaster in 40 years continues for a fifth day in West Virginia.

Sources familiar with the mediation talks say the families of 13 Upper Big Branch mine explosion victims are still considering settlement of wrongful death claims with mine owner Alpha Natural Resources.

Six families settled yesterday in mediated negotiations that began Friday at a resort in Glade Springs, W. Va.

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The Two-Way
8:27 am
Tue January 10, 2012

Marketplace Explosion Leaves At Least 30 Dead In Pakistan

At least 30 people were killed at a busy market in northwest Pakistan after a bomb was placed inside the car of a local militia group tasked with fighting against the Taliban.

CNN reports the explosion occurred in the Jamrud Market in the Khyber near the Afghan border. The AP adds:

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