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Business
4:48 am
Mon September 5, 2011

Lack Of Transparency On Overseas Jobs Data

Major U.S. companies are asking for tax breaks in order, they say, to create more jobs. But the question remains whether they will create American jobs or move their money overseas. Steve Inskeep talks to Washington Post reporter Jialynn Yang about her recent article on the subject, and how difficult it is to find data on overseas vs. domestic hiring.

Politics
4:48 am
Mon September 5, 2011

Labor's Political Clout Faces Growing Challenges

Unions are under siege, as Republican governors have curtailed collective bargaining rights in some states. As well, national labor leaders say President Barack Obama and Democrats in Washington have let them down.

Middle East
4:48 am
Mon September 5, 2011

Mubarak Trial Resumes In Egypt

In Cairo, the trial of former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak is scheduled to resume Monday. On the first day that testimony is expected, the judge has banned cameras from the courtroom. Mubarak is accused of ordering the killing of protesters during the uprising earlier this year. The 83-year-old denies the charges.

Shots - Health Blog
4:00 am
Mon September 5, 2011

Cracking The Conundrum Of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Some patients describe chronic fatigue syndrome as feeling like an "unrelenting flu."
iStockphoto.com

Nearly three decades have passed since the debate began about a series of symptoms that have come to be known as chronic fatigue syndrome. It's cause is still unknown, but over the years, researchers have identified various brain, immune system and energy metabolism irregularities involved. Some patients describe the syndrome as feeling like an "unrelenting, unremitting flu."

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NPR Story
3:58 am
Mon September 5, 2011

Airlines Weigh The Best Way To Board

Airlines have been experimenting with different boarding methods as the amount of carry-on luggage passengers bring on board has greatly slowed down the boarding process, with varying results. Steve Inskeep talks to Wall Street Journal "Middle Seat" columnist Scott McCartney about the highly contentious issue of how best to board airplanes.

NPR Story
3:58 am
Mon September 5, 2011

Romney, Perry Court Tea Party

Recent polls show that former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney's rival for the GOP presidential nomination, Texas Gov. Rick Perry, is more popular with the Tea Party rank and file. On the stump in New Hampshire over the weekend, the two leading candidates campaigned hard, and somewhat against type.

Business
3:58 am
Mon September 5, 2011

Asian Markets Tumble

Stock exchanges across Asia dropped sharply Monday after Friday's dismal U.S. employment report showing no new jobs were added in August. Japan's Nikkei index fell nearly 2 percent — with markets in South Korea, Hong Kong and Shanghai also posting major losses. Investors remain concerned by the possibility of another recession in the U.S., where markets are closed Monday for Labor Day.

Conflict In Libya
3:58 am
Mon September 5, 2011

Libya Puts Pressure On African Migration

Since the revolution against the Libyan government began in February, 850,000 people have left the country. That number is expected to rise, given the country's uncertain future. Steve Inskeep speaks to Elizabeth Ferris, a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution, about the effect of the Arab spring on massive migration across North Africa's borders.

Conflict In Libya
3:58 am
Mon September 5, 2011

Rebels Tighten Hold On Gadhafi Stronghold

Rebel forces in Libya have surrounded the town of Bani Walid, southeast of the capital Tripoli. The rebels are still hoping to negotiate a peaceful takeover of the town, a stronghold of embattled leader Moammar Gadhafi, and avoid further civilian casualties. But Gadhafi loyalists are refusing to surrender.

Business
3:00 am
Mon September 5, 2011

Wiffle Ball: Born And Still Made In The USA

The Wiffle Ball headquarters in Shelton, Conn. Every Wiffle Ball is made in the U.S.
Chris Arnold NPR

The long Labor Day weekend is a time for backyard barbecues, catching up with friends and family, and for some, a game of Wiffle Ball.

Over the years, the Wiffle Ball has wound its way into the fabric of America. Those who don't even like baseball very much have taken a swing at that white plastic ball with the oval slots around one side.

There is something about the Wiffle Ball that's kind of irresistible — toy stores and even some hardware stores across the country sell them. And for consumers looking for a ways to spend more time outside, they're pretty cheap.

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Around the Nation
12:53 pm
Sun September 4, 2011

Nation's Jails Struggle With Mentally Ill Prisoners

iStockphoto.com

Three hundred and fifty thousand: That's a conservative estimate for the number of offenders with mental illness confined in America's prisons and jails.

More Americans receive mental health treatment in prisons and jails than in hospitals or treatment centers. In fact, the three largest inpatient psychiatric facilities in the country are jails: Los Angeles County Jail, Rikers Island Jail in New York City and Cook County Jail in Illinois.

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Around the Nation
10:16 am
Sun September 4, 2011

Modern Firefighters: Tackling More Than Just Flames

Firefighters of Station 4 in Alexandria, Va.: (left to right) Chief Fire Marshall Robert B. Rodriguez, Jeff Taylor, Capt. Tony Washington, Assistant Chief of Operations Andrew Sneed.
Lily Percy NPR

Fires are on the decline nationwide, but that doesn't make a firefighters job any easier. In fact, it may be harder now. Not only are fires more complicated these days, but the scope of firefighting has changed drastically and now includes fire prevention, public education, safety inspections and more than anything, emergency medical assistance.

"Seventy percent of our calls are medical calls," probational firefighter Jeff Taylor tells weekends on All Things Considered guest host Laura Sullivan.

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Politics
6:00 am
Sun September 4, 2011

Palin Offers No Clues On Presidential Ambitions

Former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin offered her supporters no hint of her political plans during a speech Saturday at a Tea Party rally in Iowa.

The atmosphere was that of an end-of-summer county fair. There was plenty of food, lots of T-shirts for sale even some country music. But for the 2,000 or so people gathered on a soggy field in Indianola, south of Des Moines, Palin was the main attraction. It wasnt her first visit to Iowa, home of the nation's first presidential caucus next year.

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Reflecting On Sept. 11, 2001
5:14 am
Sun September 4, 2011

Ten Years Later, Flight 93 Memorial Still Unfinished

Lloyd Smith, left, and Laura Sprankle of Hagerstown, Md., visit the overlook at the temporary Flight 93 memorial in Shanksville, Pa., Monday, Aug. 1, 2011.
Gene J. Puskar ASSOCIATED PRESS

Originally published on Sun September 4, 2011 7:58 am

The National Park Service will dedicate a new memorial to the passengers of United Airlines Flight 93 next Saturday, in time for the 10-year anniversary of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks.

The airplane crashed outside the town of Shanksville in southwestern Pennsylvania. A decade later, it's the only one of the three major Sept. 11 memorials that has yet to be fully funded.

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Around the Nation
4:30 am
Sun September 4, 2011

Gator Wrestling: 'Not A Thinking Man's Sport'

Jay Young, owner of Colorado Gators, holds Peewee, his 11-year-old daughter's former pet. Colorado Gators offers classes on how to wrestle alligators.
Sean Post

Standing in a pool full of 2-foot-long alligators, Jay Young starts teaching a class on gator wrestling.

"He who hesitates gets bit. Don't think about it," says Young, owner of Colorado Gators. "Alligator wrestling is not a thinking man's sport."

It takes a certain kind of crazy to want to pay $100 to handle animals sensible people run away from. People do sign up, however, ready to try their hands at this most extreme of sports.

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Conflict In Libya
4:07 am
Sun September 4, 2011

Future African Relations Among Uncertainty In Libya

Moammar Gadhafi bankrolled and championed the vision of a United States of Africa, with himself as the continental president. As Libya struggles to find its equilibrium on the cusp of what appears to be the post-Gadhafi era, one question is its future as part of Africa.

The African Union has not officially recognized the rebel leadership in Libya, saying "regime change" and outside intervention were wrong.

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Around the Nation
12:37 am
Sun September 4, 2011

Tropical Storm Lee Reaches Louisiana Coast

The center of Tropical Storm Lee lurched across Louisiana's Gulf Coast early Sunday, dumping torrential rains that threatened flooding in low-lying communities in a foreshadowing of what cities further inland could face in coming days.

At 5 a.m. EDT, Lee had maximum sustained winds of 45 mph, the U.S. National Hurricane Center said. It says Lee is crawling to the north at 2 mph. Forecasters say a slow northeastward motion is expected as it treks across southern Louisiana.

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Politics
1:38 pm
Sat September 3, 2011

Restrictions On SuperPACs Not Super Clear

Consultants have been practically tripping over each other to launch superPACs backing Texas Gov. Rick Perry. However, some prospective donors may find presidential superPACs are a gray area.

By now there's a superPAC independently supporting every major presidential candidate. Three of these groups have surfaced to promote Perry. In California, Bob Schuman says he was ready to go before Perry was.

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NPR Story
1:00 pm
Sat September 3, 2011

Week In News: Job Numbers, The President's Speech And EPA Regulations

Weekends on All Things Considered guest host Laura Sullivan discusses the disappointing August employment numbers, as well as the President's upcoming jobs speech and more of the week's news with Los Angeles Times Washington columnist Doyle McManus.

Planet Money
7:25 am
Sat September 3, 2011

The Government's Case Against The Banks

Chuck Burton AP

During the housing boom, banks sold investors bundles of mortgages that were shoddier than promised, according to lawsuits the federal government filed yesterday.

This allegation won't come as a surprise to anyone who has followed the financial crisis; similar accusations have been flying around for years.

It's the scope of the lawsuits that makes them such a big deal: 17 separate suits naming many of the world's biggest banks and covering nearly $200 billion in mortgage-backed securities.

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Economy
6:00 am
Sat September 3, 2011

Youth Joblessness Creates Ripple Effect

Not having a summer or after-school job affects more than just a kid's wallet. It also has real consequences for his or her personal and economic development.

While the overall unemployment rate is stuck at 9.1 percent, the unemployment rate for 16- to 19-year-olds has been going up since February. Currently 25.4 percent of teenagers who want jobs can't find them.

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Economy
4:22 am
Sat September 3, 2011

Jobs Numbers Paint 'Very Gloomy' Picture For All

President Obama is set to deliver a major speech on jobs next Thursday, and his task will be even more challenging after Friday's monthly government jobs report. The U.S. Labor Department says there was no job growth for the first time in a year, and unemployment was unimproved, staying at 9.1 percent.

NPR's Scott Horsley tells Weekend Edition host Scott Simon some jobs were added, but not enough to make up for other losses.

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National Security
3:38 am
Sat September 3, 2011

WikiLeaks Now Victim Of Its Own Leak

The founder of WikiLeaks, Julian Assange, once said his mission was not simply to divulge secrets, but to make sure the release of that information actually made a difference.

He shared his trove of diplomatic cables with The New York Times, the Guardian in London, and other news organizations so they could draw the world's attention to the most important parts.

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Research News
7:03 pm
Fri September 2, 2011

Why The Trip Home Seems To Go By Faster

Does getting home from your vacation spot always seem to take less time than getting there? A new scientific study provides an explanation for why.
Harold M. Lambert Lambert/Getty Images

In 1969, astronaut Alan Bean went to the moon as the lunar module pilot on Apollo 12. Although the trip going to the moon covered the same distance as the trip back, "returning from the moon seemed much shorter," Bean says.

People will often feel a return trip took less time than the same outbound journey, even though it didn't. In the case of Apollo 12, the trip back from the moon really did take somewhat less time. But the point remains that this so-called "return trip effect" is a very real psychological phenomenon, and now a new scientific study provides an explanation.

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The Two-Way
4:26 pm
Fri September 2, 2011

Federal Government Sues Big Banks Over Risky Mortgage Securities

The Federal Government filed suit against more than a dozen big banks over mortgage backed securities the banks sold during the housing boom. Essentially the government claims the banks were selling securities that were riskier than advertised.

As we reported earlier, The New York Times reported this news, last night. But, now, the Federal Housing Finance Agency, which was appointed to oversee mortgage buyers Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, filed the lawsuits today.

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The Two-Way
3:40 pm
Fri September 2, 2011

Federal Judge Rules Roger Clemens Will Face New Trial

Originally published on Fri September 2, 2011 3:54 pm

One-time baseball pitching star Roger Clemens is not off the hook.

A federal judge ruled Friday that Clemens must stand trial a second time for allegedly lying to a Congressional committee about steroid use. In July, Judge Reggie Walton declared a mistrial due to prosecutorial misconduct.

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The Two-Way
3:13 pm
Fri September 2, 2011

Rupert Murdoch Receives $12.5M Bonus; Son James Declines $6M Bonus

News Corp. Chief Executive Rupert Murdoch (right), testifying alongside his son James, said his appearance before a British parliamentary inquiry in London was "the most humble day of my life."
Parbul AFP/Getty Images

Rupert Murdoch, the chairman and chief executive of the embattled News Corporation, received a $12.5 million cash bonus for the fiscal year that ended in June.

That may come as a surprise, considering that Murdoch has been at the helm of News Corp. as it tries to weather a phone hacking scandal that has led to the arrest of 13 people and the resignation of two of Murdoch's top executives.

Murdoch's son, James, who is his deputy, turned down a $6 million bonus, which would have been a 74 percent increase from his 2010 take-home pay.

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It's All Politics
2:56 pm
Fri September 2, 2011

House GOP: Approval Of Special Olympics Torch Run Trumps Obama Address

Originally published on Sun September 4, 2011 7:40 am

It became clearer today why John Boehner this week became the first U.S. House Speaker in the nation's history to turn down a president's request to address a joint session of Congress.

The House has pressing business Wednesday evening, when President Obama asked to speak to members of Congress about his plans to goose the stagnant jobs market.

Pressing, as in:

Considering the extension of the "Generalized System of Preferences."

Contemplating the Civilian Service Recognition Act of 2011.

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Shots - Health Blog
1:54 pm
Fri September 2, 2011

Tiny Strokes May Cause The Shuffling Gait of Old Age

Stroke so small they're never noticed may add up.
Lisa F. Young iStockphoto.com

Old people who don't have signs of cardiovascular disease still may have suffered microscopic strokes that don't show up on conventional tests. The small strokes may impair their ability to walk, balance and function just the same.

Scientists examined the brains of 418 priests and nuns after they died. The researchers found that one-third of the brains that had seemed normal using conventional tests while the people were alive actually had damage to tiny blood vessels. The damage was so slight it was impossible to see without a microscope.

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The Two-Way
1:51 pm
Fri September 2, 2011

Pot Brownie Mix-Up Gives Canadian Office Workers Unexpected Buzz

Be careful what you eat at work, because you don't know exactly what's in that batch of delicious brownies.

That's the lesson a group office drones learned in Victoria, British Columbia. The Vancouver Sun reports that three people ate some brownies brought to the office by a co-worker. After a while, the workers started complaining of "light-headedness, numbness in the limbs and disorientation."

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