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1:26 pm
Mon August 15, 2011

For Slice Of Fame, Pizzerias Spar Over 'Oldest' Title

Pizza before it is put in a coal-burning oven at Lombardi's. Lombardi's opened its doors in 1905 in Manhattan's Little Italy neighborhood.
courtesy of Lombardi's Pizza

For years, a New York restaurant has claimed to be the oldest pizzeria in the country, but now a rival from Trenton, N.J., says it deserves the crown.

A Trenton tomato pie starts out like any other pizza, with the dough, which has to be flattened by hand. Then things are a little different.

"We put the dough out first, then we put cheese on, then we put the tomatoes on the top because it tastes better," says Nick Azzaro, the owner of Papa's Tomato Pies. "I can tell you a lot of reasons, but that's the basic."

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The Two-Way
1:13 pm
Mon August 15, 2011

British Police Arrest Man For Planning Water Fight Over Blackberry Messenger

Essex Police arrested a man for planning a water fight in Colchester, England. Police said on Twitter that the man tried to organize others using Blackberry's messaging service. Police presented the news on its website in the context of last week's riots.

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Europe
1:01 pm
Mon August 15, 2011

Europe's Economic Crisis Claims Political Victims

European leaders are shown here at an EU summit June 23 in Brussels, Belgium. The continent's economic crisis has helped bring down two governments so far this year and several are in danger of being ousted from power.
Michel Spingler AP

Europe's economic problems are having real political consequences.

A declining euro and government austerity measures have set off regular rounds of street protests and even riots. Political parties in Portugal and Ireland have been ousted from power this year. Spain seems likely to change governments in early elections called for November, while leaders in France, Italy and Greece remain at risk.

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Your Money
1:00 pm
Mon August 15, 2011

401(k) Nation: Road To Retirement Gets Rockier

Broker and financial adviser Jim Lacamp has been in the business long enough to remember when Americans had little stake and even less interest in the stock market.

It was a time when "people had a pension and profit-sharing plan that was run by [their] company," says Lacamp, senior vice president at Fort Worth, Texas-based Macro Portfolio Advisors. "They might see what a stock did on the news, but it didn't really have an impact on their daily lives."

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Shots - Health Blog
12:59 pm
Mon August 15, 2011

Vampire Bats. Bites. Rabies. Oh My!

A vampire bat is caught in a net in the northeastern Amazon in Brazil in 2005.
MARIO QUADROS ASSOCIATED PRESS

A man dies in Louisiana after being bitten by a rabid vampire — bat, that is. It sounds like an episode of "True Blood," HBO's series that follows the fictional doings of Louisiana vampires.

But no, this was an actual missive from Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, the journal of the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention covering all things infectious and deadly.

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The Two-Way
12:33 pm
Mon August 15, 2011

Yvonne, A Cow Wrapped In A Mystery Inside A Forest

A cow named Yvonne has eluded capture since escaping a German farm in May. She's been spotted roaming a forest, but searchers haven't been able to get close to her. Now an animal psychic has been called in.
Josef Enzinger dapd

In Germany, a dairy cow named Yvonne's death-defying escape — and continued success in eluding capture — has become an incandescent symbol of freedom and animal dignity. Okay, that may be hyperbolic. But how else to explain scores of visitors to Zangberg, the Bavarian commune Yvonne calls home, or the 10,000-euro reward offered for her safe return?

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The Two-Way
10:53 am
Mon August 15, 2011

Hot Dog Faceoff: Ball Park And Oscar Mayer In Court

America's two largest hot dog makers face off in a district courthouse in Chicago today, in a case that may determine the limits companies must observe when putting down their competition in advertisements.

The quibble started in 2009, when an Oscar Mayer ad campaign directly targeted Ball Park Franks, with the claim "We are tastier." As proof, it cited a "national taste test" — organized by Oscar Mayer. The folks at Ball Park weren't satisfied.

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The Two-Way
10:38 am
Mon August 15, 2011

Egyptian Judge Bans Broadcast Of Mubarak Trial

An Egyptian judge adjourned the trial of former President Hosni Mubarak and banned live broadcasts of it, today. As NPR's Mike Shuster reported this morning, the judge struggled to maintain control of the courtroom and Mubarak, who is charged with corruption and of ordering the killing of hundreds of protesters earlier this year, said only one world: "Present."

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Election 2012
10:00 am
Mon August 15, 2011

GOP Presidential Front Feels Dramatic Shake Up

Over the weekend, Minn. Rep. Michele Bachmann won Iowa's Ames Straw Poll, and Texas Gov. Rick Perry announced his White House run while former Minn. Gov. Tim Pawlenty withdrew. President Obama is also starting his bus tour of the Midwest. Guest host Tony Cox discusses presidential politics with Republican strategist Ron Christie and Salon.com's Joan Walsh.

Economy
10:00 am
Mon August 15, 2011

Clyburn Hopeful In Super 12's Debt Reduction Power

The 12 members of the Super Committee are responsible for finding $1.2 trillion of savings by November. Guest host Tony Cox speaks with one of the members, Rep. James Clyburn (D-S.C.), about the committee's ability to address debt reduction. Clyburn says everything is on the table for compromise.

The Two-Way
9:31 am
Mon August 15, 2011

U.K. Says Hundreds Of Tons Of Oil Have Leaked In North Sea

A picture released by Shell shows the Gannet Alpha platform in the North Sea. Shell is battling an oil leak in a North Sea pipeline off the British coast.
Ken Taylor AFP/Getty Images

The oil leak at the Gannet Alpha platform off the Scottish coast has spilled "several hundred tons of oil" into the North Sea said the U.K.'s Department for Energy and Climate Change.

Royal Dutch Shell, which owns the platform, said it estimates 1,300 barrels have been spilled and said it was "significant." The AP adds:

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Closing Walter Reed
9:09 am
Mon August 15, 2011

When Will Closing Walter Reed Pay Off? Maybe 2018

BRAC Commission Chairman Anthony J. Principi, and other member of the commission raise their hands in favor of closing Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington during a base closing hearing Aug. 25, 2005 in Arlington, Va.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Originally published on Wed August 31, 2011 4:08 pm

When the Walter Reed Army Medical Center was slated for closure back in 1995, the goals were to improve care for wounded soldiers, and to save money. The final patients left this past week.

But with closing Walter Reed now estimated to cost more than $1 billion more than originally predicted, it could take many years before the military will realize any savings.

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Shots - Health Blog
9:03 am
Mon August 15, 2011

Coconut Water To The Rescue? Parsing The Medical Claims

Coconut water may not be the ideal replacement fluid if you're dehydrated.
iStockphoto.com

Hydration is something we're inclined to worry about in the summertime, when we sweat more and can be at risk of heat exhaustion if we don't get enough fluids. And while most doctors say water is the ideal fluid for rehydrating, coconut water, the latest faddish recovery drink, is being heavily marketed as "more hydrating" than H20.

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The Two-Way
8:45 am
Mon August 15, 2011

Motorola Acquisition Would Throw Google Into The Thick Of Mobile Hardware

Google announced this morning that it was acquiring Motorola Mobility Holdings for $40 a share in cash or $12.5 billion. It is the largest acquisition for Google and it throws Google firmly into the mobile business.

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Politics
8:24 am
Mon August 15, 2011

Summertime Politics: Bring Out The Flip-Flops

iStockphoto.com

Flip-flops are good. Flip-flops are bad. It's summertime and everybody is talking about flip-flops. Political flip-flops, that is.

As the dust settles from the recent Republican debate and straw poll in Iowa, flip-flops keep cropping up like spent corncobs. In the debate, Newt Gingrich "was asked about his position on military action against Libya," the St. Petersburg Times reported. "We explored whether he flip-flopped and rated it Full Flop."

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The Two-Way
7:10 am
Mon August 15, 2011

Warren Buffett: Please, Raise My Taxes

Warren Buffett.
Seth Wenig AP

In an editorial in The New York Times, Warren Buffett, the so called "Oracle of Omaha" and one of the richest men in the world, has a message for Congress: Leave 99.7 percent of Americans alone and raise taxes on those who make more than $1 million and raise them even more for those who make more than $10 million — like him.

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Opinion
7:05 am
Mon August 15, 2011

Weekly Standard: Bachmann Supporters Not Yet Sold

Republican presidential candidate Rep. Michele Bachmann steps from her campaign bus to greet supporters after winning the Iowa Republican Party's Straw Poll in Ames, Iowa, Saturday, Aug. 13, 2011.
Charles Dharapak AP

John McCormack is a staff writer for The Weekly Standard.

Michele Bachmann scored a victory Saturday at the Ames GOP presidential straw poll that confirmed her position as the front-runner in Iowa. But just how deep does support for the Minnesota congresswoman run? While Bachmann certainly has a reputation for drawing intense and loyal support from Tea Partiers and evangelicals, almost all of the Bachmann supporters I spoke to Saturday in Ames said they weren't certain to support her in the Iowa caucuses.

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Opinion
7:04 am
Mon August 15, 2011

The Nation: It's Hallelujah In Iowa For Bachmann

Throughout the weekend, Michele Bachmann stressed God and taxes at the Iowa Straw Poll. Bachmann came in first at the mock election.
iStockphoto.com

Sarah Posner is senior editor of Religion Dispatches, where she writes a blog about religion and politics.

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Opinion
6:36 am
Mon August 15, 2011

Foreign Policy: Crash Is The New Normal

Specialist James Ahrens works at his post on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange Wednesday, Aug. 10, 2011. The stock market has fluctuated greatly since the United States' credit rating was lowered.
Richard Drew AP

Mohamed El-Erian is CEO of investment management firm Pimco and author of When Markets Collide.

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Small Businesses, Big Problems
6:08 am
Mon August 15, 2011

Series Overview: Small Businesses, Big Problems

Daphne Wilson, center, and her engineering team review plans for controls systems at Mitchell International Airport in Milwaukee.
Erin Toner Milwaukee Public Radio

Every business starts small. But more than ever, it's harder to turn small businesses into bigger companies that employ more people. In a country that desperately needs more jobs, this is a big problem.

Small firms represent about 99 percent of all U.S. businesses, but a study by the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation shows that while businesses are being formed at roughly the same rate as in the past — the number of startups is even rising — these small businesses create fewer jobs than in the past.

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The Two-Way
6:00 am
Mon August 15, 2011

Reports: Pakistan Let China See Helicopter Left At Bin Laden's Compound

"Pakistan allowed Chinese military engineers to photograph and take samples from the top-secret stealth helicopter that U.S. special forces left behind when they killed Osama bin Laden," The Financial Times says it has been told by "people close to the White House and the Central Intelligence Agency."

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The Two-Way
5:35 am
Mon August 15, 2011

As He Hits The Road, Obama's Approval Rating Hits New Low

www.gallup.com

President Obama today sets off on a bus tour through Minnesota, Iowa and Illinois that will extend into the middle of the week.

And as he does, there's this news from the pollsters at Gallup:

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Opinion
5:21 am
Mon August 15, 2011

Weekly Standard: Kid Tested, Not FDA Approved

Washington may pass legislation that restricts marketing foods to children.
iStockphoto.com

Kate Havard is an intern at The Weekly Standard.

The Obama administration is after your Lucky Charms, or at least your children's. The public comment period closed on July 14 for a set of "voluntary" guidelines for the marketing of food to children. If adopted, these rules will transform the advertising of breakfast cereals.

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The Two-Way
5:20 am
Mon August 15, 2011

Bombs Kill Dozens In Iraq; Mubarak Trial Resumes

Good morning.

Seemingly coordinated bombings in more than a dozen Iraqi cities today have left more than 50 people dead and even more wounded, according to various media reports. The Associated Press reports that "the blasts were coordinated to go off in the morning and included a combination of parked car bombs, roadside bombs and a suicide bomber driving a vehicle that rammed into a police station."

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Opinion
5:20 am
Mon August 15, 2011

New Republic: Greek To You? Nope, Just Yogurt

A container of Greek yogurt is opened and ready to eat. Some argue that calling this type of yogurt "Greek" is simply a marketing ploy.
iStockphoto.com

Margy Slattery is an intern at The New Republic.

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Iraq
1:18 am
Mon August 15, 2011

Dozens Killed In Twin Explosion In Iraqi City

An Iraqi medical official says the death toll from twin bombings at a market in a city southeast of Baghdad has risen to 34.

The top medical official in the province where the city of Kut is located, Diaa al-Aboudi, says 60 people were also wounded in the blast on Monday.

Police spokesman Lt. Col. Dhurgam Mohammed Hassan says the first bomb went off in a freezer used to keep drinks cold.

Then as rescuers and onlookers gathered, a parked car bomb exploded.

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Shots - Health Blog
10:02 pm
Sun August 14, 2011

Younger Siblings Of Autistic Kids: Their Risk Greater Than Thought

Judith Ursitti is a Massachusetts mother of two children with autism spectrum disorders. Her son, Jack, 7, has severe autism, while her daughter, Amy (not pictured), who's 11, has Asperger's.
Richard Knox NPR News

Autism specialists have long thought the disease has a strong genetic component -– maybe stronger than any other neurodevelopmental disorder.

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Economy
10:01 pm
Sun August 14, 2011

Oh, The Nerve: Betting On Fear In A Volatile Market

A trader studies his computer screen in the VIX pit at the Chicago Board Options Exchange on April 27.
Brian Kersey Getty Images

If being invested in a wildly unpredictable stock market freaks you out right now, you're definitely not alone.

In fact, there's an index to measure that nervousness, and even trade on it. It's called the Volatility Index, or VIX, but it also goes by another name: the fear gauge. And during times like these, the VIX draws lots of attention.

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Small Businesses, Big Problems
10:01 pm
Sun August 14, 2011

Growing Pains Hurt Native American Food Company

Native America Natural Foods products.
Charles Michael Ray SDPB

First of a five-part series

If you think unemployment is bad where you live, take a look at the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota.

Tribal officials there say more than 70 percent of the working-age population is without a job. And within one of the nation's toughest local economies, a reservation-based business is struggling to grow.

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Crisis In The Housing Market
10:01 pm
Sun August 14, 2011

Low Rates Alone Not Seen Reviving Housing Market

The turmoil in the financial markets has been pushing mortgage rates lower. Thirty-year fixed-rate mortgages have now fallen to about 4.3 percent, which is very close to the lowest level on record.

But many Americans can't qualify for those low rates, and analysts say these historic interest rates aren't likely to do much to help the housing market.

That is, unless the government intervenes.

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