Rebecca Martinez

Reporter

Phone: 307-766-2405
Email:  

Rebecca Martinez is a general assignment reporter and host for Wyoming Public Radio. Recent features include Yellowstone warding visitors off wildlife after four people in the area were killed by grizzly bears (picked up by NPR) and one covering efforts by the Northern Arapaho Tribe to preserve its language on the Wind River Indian Reservation, (part was re-aired on National Native News). She regularly reports on agriculture and environmental issues, focusing especially on waste management and water quality. Rebecca reported a story featured in a PRNDI-award-winning episode of Open Spaces in 2011. She edited other PRNDI-award winning stories.

After earning her B.A. in Journalism and Media Design at James Madison University, Rebecca worked as a production and editorial assistant at NPR headquarters in Washington D.C., where she produced pieces and wrote scripts for Morning Edition, All Things Considered, Weekend Edition and Tell Me More. She arranged and scripted interviews for ME and ATC during the 2008 Presidential Election Season and helped organized live coverage on Super Tuesday in New York City.

Rebecca has reported pieces for NPR, APM’s Marketplace,  the BBC/PRI’s The World, National Native News, WAMU-FM in Washington, D.C. and the CBC. Before coming to Wyoming Public Radio, Rebecca moved to Virginia’s Shenandoah Valley, where she covered the agriculture, environment and community beats at the News Leader, a century-old newspaper in Staunton. She continued audio reporting by producing Soundslides videos for the newspaper’s web site. Much of her reporting focused on the cattle industry, water and soil quality issues, and the effects of environmental legislation on farmers.

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Mining
8:23 am
Tue September 4, 2012

Wyoming increases exports of soda ash

Associated Press

Exports of Wyoming soda ash were up the first half of this year.

Wyoming Mining Association Executive Director Marion Loomis says Wyoming usually exports about one-third of its soda ash, but production is up, and now half is going to Mexico, Canada and Asian and South American countries.

Loomis blames the suffering US economy for the lack of domestic demand for soda ash, which is used to make glass, detergents and home building products.

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Open Spaces, Wyoming Public Media
4:12 pm
Fri August 31, 2012

August 31st, 2012

The creeks that Orville Johnson’s cows would normally drink from are dry this year.
Willow Belden

Drought, hay shortage mean tough economic times for Wyoming ag industry
The U.S. Department of Agriculture says this year’s hay crop will be the worst in decades, because of the drought. Hay is already in short supply, and prices have spiked. Wyoming Public Radio’s Willow Belden reports that the hay shortage is forcing ranchers to make tough choices and could have a lingering economic impact on the state’s ag industry.

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Open Spaces
3:31 pm
Fri August 31, 2012

Carp are thriving, unpopular in Wyoming waterways; can be composted

Janet “Ogre” Chen stalks common carp with a bow and arrow in Wheatland Reservoir #3.
Rebecca Martinez

Wyoming fisheries no longer stock state waterways with carp, but the species is still alive and well throughout the state. Wyoming Public Radio’s Rebecca Martinez filed this end-of-summer postcard about her first experience with the common carp… and with bow-fishing.

(Arrow shot into water)

REBECCA MARTINEZ: For the unskilled archer, shooting a carp – even a massive one – with a bow and arrow is no easy task. I learned that first-hand this summer during an afternoon of bow-fishing at Wheatland Reservoir Number Three.

(Arrow shot into water)

MARTINEZ: Nuts!

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News
6:12 pm
Mon August 27, 2012

Wind River Reservation residents have mixed feelings about new sex offender registry

Wind River Reservation

Tribal leaders are pleased that a sex offender registry and compliance enforcement office has been established on the Wind River Reservation.

The office in Ethete was established under the Sex Offender Registration and Notification Act – or SORNA – to close reporting gaps among states, territories and Indian Country. Before it opened on August 17, there was no way to force sex offenders living, working or studying on the reservation to make their presence known to the public.

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Wind River Indian Reservation
8:45 am
Fri August 24, 2012

Sex offender registry established on Wind River Reservation

The Northern Arapaho Tribe has set up a sex offender registration office on the Wind River Indian Reservation. The Northern Arapaho and Eastern Shoshone tribes recently agreed to share the registry. The first offender was registered Friday.

The office was established under the Sex Offender Registration and Notification Act – or SORNA – to close reporting gaps among states, territories and Indian Country.

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News
5:42 am
Mon August 20, 2012

USDA Offers Grants To Ag Producers Who Want To Expand Businesses

The US Department of Agriculture is accepting application for producers who want to develop value-added activities for their businesses.

Derrel Carruth directs the Wyoming USDA Rural Development Office. He says activities where producers see their product through the next steps of production cut out the middle man and can be good for the bottom line.

“If an agricultural producer was in the dairy business, they might want to convert some of that milk to ice cream or to cheese. So, it’s an additional source of income that comes from their operation.”

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Open Spaces
3:21 pm
Fri August 17, 2012

Ag Industry Encourages Producers to Add Value To Businesses

Kelsey Hostetler dyes yarn by hand at Mountain Meadow Wool Mill in Buffalo
Rebecca Martinez

Wyoming agriculture producers raise and lots of cows and sheep… but they’re mostly sold out of state, where they’re processed and sold as beef and lamb, making big money for outside businesses. Wyoming Public Radio’s Rebecca Martinez reports that state agriculture agencies are now encouraging ag producers of all kinds to add-value to the products they already have to keep their businesses competitive, and circulate the money in Wyoming.

REBECCA MARTINEZ: Bessie Zeller and her late husband Clarence took over his father’s Lovell beekeeping operation in the mid-1940s.

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Police Shooting
11:43 am
Thu August 16, 2012

HEADLINE: Laramie man shot by police is in serious, stable condition

Laramie police say that a Laramie man was shot last night after assaulting a police officer.

Laramie Police Commander Mitch Cushman says two Laramie Police officers responded to a call about a car burglary.

“Upon their arrival, they were confronted by an aggressive male subject who assaulted one of the officers with a weapon. During that altercation, the suspect was shot by that officer.”

The suspect is 26 year-old Kevin R. Cook.

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News
6:25 pm
Tue August 14, 2012

Wyoming feels limited impacted from national hike in gas prices

Gas Buddy Dot Com

Wyoming has been relatively insulated from a jump in American gasoline prices.

Gregg Laskoski is a senior petroleum analyst for Gas-Buddy-dot-com. He says supply problems – exacerbated by a pipeline rupture in Wisconsin and refinery fires in California and Indiana – are behind rising prices.

Laskoski says the national average price of gas is $3.67, up $.25 from last month… but gas in Wyoming has only risen by $.05.

“Wyoming has been able to access cheaper Canadian crude oil,” Laskoski says. “In addition to that, Wyoming has a very low fuel tax.”

News
6:21 pm
Tue August 14, 2012

Bison hunt to begin

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department received thousands of applications for bison hunting permits this year, and invited about 400 of those to hunt.

Spokesman Mark Gocke says hunters will be helping to reduce the herd size of the largest land animal in North America. The ideal herd size is 500 bison, but there are currently 900.

Gocke says the drought has driven the bison herd from its typical summer rangeland and onto the Elk Refuge seeking forage. The herd competes with elk and other animals for food.

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News
7:38 am
Mon August 6, 2012

Albany County Landowners Worry The CAPP Resolution Could Threaten Their Homes

Some landowners on the aquifer recharge area east of Laramie object to language in the Albany County Casper Aquifer Protection Plan’s draft resolution.

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News
4:19 pm
Fri August 3, 2012

Yellowstone to host climate change workshop for teachers

Yellowstone National Park will host a climate change educational workshop for teachers this month.

During the four-day workshop, a representative from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration will explain how climate change works, and rangers will talk with teachers about where Yellowstone is seeing impacts, including increased wildfire activity and threats to pika habitat.

Katherine Chesson worked with the parks Climate Challenge, which runs similar programs in parks around the country.

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News
6:22 pm
Tue July 31, 2012

President Signs Federal Tribal Land Lease Legislation

Wind River Reservation

After the US Senate unanimously passed the HEARTH ACT – giving tribes more control over leasing Indian land – President Obama has signed it into law.

The legislation will allow tribal governments to approve surface leases on Indian land directly, instead of waiting for the federal Bureau of Indian Affairs to approve them. Eastern Shoshone Business Council co-chairman Wes Martel says going through the B-I-A could take years.

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News
5:18 pm
Mon July 30, 2012

Small businesses are eligible for federal drought-relief loans

Because of the drought, small, nonfarm businesses in most Wyoming counties are now eligible to apply for low interest federal disaster loans from the U. S. Small Business Administration.

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Water
8:04 am
Mon July 30, 2012

Casper Aquifer Protection Plan Resolution Is Up For Public Comment

Associated Press

A group in Laramie called Citizens for Clean Water is circulating a petition calling for changes to the Albany County Board of Commissioners’ Casper Aquifer Protection Plan draft resolution. The resolution will lay out what kind of development can proceed over the aquifer’s recharge area for the next two years.

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Open Spaces
6:09 pm
Fri July 27, 2012

July 27, 2012

BAER Teams Check Extent of Damage After Wild-land Fires
Irina Zhorov

BAER Teams Check Extent of Damage After Wild-land Fires

The fire season came early to Wyoming this year. Usually, Wyoming doesn’t see its biggest fires until late July but already there have been 10 fires that have burned over 265-thousand acres of land. Wet weather and the efforts of thousands of firefighters have contained the larger blazes …So what happens after a fire? Wyoming Public Radio’s Irina Zhorov reports.

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Open Spaces
5:21 pm
Fri July 27, 2012

Albany County Takes Public Comment On Future Of Casper Aquifer

Tim Sullivan, Albany County Commissioner
Albany County, Wyoming

HOST INTRO: The Casper Aquifer provides fresh groundwater to Laramie and a portion of Albany County. The water is in great condition, and the city and county have traditionally worked in tandem to keep it that way, but their paths diverged a few years ago. Now, Albany County’s most recent Casper Aquifer Protection Plan resolution is open for public comment, and the public has had a lot to say about it. Rebecca Martinez reports.

(water faucet ambi)

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Open Spaces
4:19 pm
Fri July 27, 2012

Broadway-Bound Musical “Allegiance” Takes A Journey Through Heart Mountain Internment Camp

georgetakei.com

The Heart Mountain Relocation Center near Powell was one of several in the country that interned Japanese-Americans during World War II. The camp now sets the scene for a new musical called “Allegiance,” starring George Takei of Star Trek fame. The story follows the Kimura Family in the weeks after they are forced to leave their farm in Salinas, California and move to the internment camp in Wyoming. Wyoming Public Radio’s Rebecca Martinez spoke with producer Lorenzo Thione and composer Jay Kuo, who co-wrote the play , which will open in San Diego in September.

Healthcare
6:14 pm
Fri July 20, 2012

Cheyenne and Casper hospitals decide not to merge

Hospitals in Casper and Cheyenne will remain separate, after considering the benefits of merging.

Cheyenne Regional Medical Center and Wyoming Medical Center have been researching whether it would be feasible and cost-effective to join forces and share services.

Leigh West, a spokesperson for Cheyenne Regional Medical Center says distance and I-T incompatibility got in the way.

“In the end, as we looked at that, those savings and enhancements weren’t going to be significant enough to warrant coming together with an official partnership,” West says.

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Open Spaces
3:42 pm
Fri July 20, 2012

15 Years In: WWAMI Program Produces Wyoming Doctors Who Settle In the State

Second-year WWAMI student Mark Wefel worked with Dr. Dean Bartholomew at the Platte valley Medical Clinic in Saratoga this summer as part of a four-week Rural/Underserved Opportunity Program (RUOP).
Rebecca Martinez
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Veterans
6:10 pm
Tue July 17, 2012

Cheyenne VA Seeks Caregivers For Wartime Veterans

The Department of Veterans Affairs is interviewing caregivers for wartime veterans who need to be placed in a supervised homes ituation, but not necessarily a nursing home.

Irene Johnson coordinates the Medical Foster Home Program at the Cheyenne V-A. She says some veterans have mental or physical disabilities that make it difficult for them to manage their medications or eat properly.

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Healthcare
5:54 pm
Mon July 16, 2012

Miners Hospital Board still looking for cuts

After proposing changes to its programs for current and retired miners in the state, the Wyoming Miners Hospital Board has announced it will withdraw those proposals.

Last month the Board proposed barring clerical workers – or people not directly involved with the extraction process – from receiving benefits. Also those under age 50 would not be eligible for benefits unless they were disabled or unable to work.

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Rodeo
3:47 pm
Fri July 13, 2012

Rock Springs braces for National High School Rodeo Finals; 10,000 visitors expected

Sweetwater County authorities are bracing for a flood of visitors, as the National High School Rodeo Finals kicks off in Rock Springs next week.

County Undersheriff Craig Jackson expects more than 10,000 people to visit the town. More than 60 officers will handle the security detail, but at law enforcement and emergency management personnel from across the county will be working to keep visitors and residents safe next week.

Jackson says it’s great practice.

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News
6:24 pm
Thu July 12, 2012

Wild Cutthroat Trout Rebounds in Hoback River

Courtesty of Wyoming Game and Fish

The cutthroat trout population in the Hoback River in the Bridger-Teton National Forest has rebounded since the Wyoming Game and Fish Department stopped stocking the river in 2005.

Fisheries Biologist Diana Miller says the state had been supplying the river with trout for 50 years prior, because biologists believed the species wasn’t weathering the harsh winters and ice there.

“What we believed happen was when we were putting fish into the river, the hatchery fish were taking up all of the space and all of the food that wild fish could have been utilizing.”

Tourism
3:58 pm
Thu July 12, 2012

Yellowstone sees jump in visitation, urges visitors to plan ahead

Al Nash, Yellowstone National Park

Yellowstone National Park Officials are urging visitors to be patient and plan ahead this summer.

The park saw almost 675,000 visitors in June. That’s about 30,000 more visitors than the same month last year.

Yellowstone spokesman Al Nash says the park always draws a healthy flow of tourists, but outside factors can boost visitation.

“We had good weather, gas prices aren’t as high as they have been, and maybe people are feeling a little better about their ability to spend a little money on vacation.”

July is always the busiest month of the year.

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News
9:36 am
Thu July 12, 2012

WIC raises income ceiling for eligible women

More low-income women might have more access to better nutrition and health information.  That’s because the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children – or WIC – has raised the annual income ceiling for eligible participants by one-thousand dollars.

WIC participants can receive nutritious food and learn how to make healthy decisions for themselves and their families.

Wyoming WIC program manager Janet Moran says serving at-risk mothers early on can prevent health problems later.

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