Open Spaces
11:58 am
Wed November 9, 2011

February 11th, 2011

Listen to the Whole Show

A Listing of Today Stories:

At the Legislature, Considering Constitutional Amendments
Wyoming voters rarely get a chance to change the constitution. But the legislature may give citizens the chance to vote on a gay marriage ban and even the right to hunt. As of Friday morning, five proposed constitutional amendments are still alive in the Wyoming legislature. Longtime observers say that's an unusually high number.

Education, and How to Improve ItĀ 
Education has been at the top of the list, in terms of big issues this legislative session. Specifically, education and accountability. Legislators want to see improvements in student performance, but the question is how to achieve that. Wyoming Public Radio's Katherine Flagg put that question to regular citizens, here in Laramie, and produced this story.

A treasured plant collection, hiding in plain sight
There is a little known institution tucked away on the University of Wyoming campus. The Rocky Mountain Herbarium was founded by Wyoming botanist Aven Nelson in 1893 and is home to over a million plant specimens from around the World. Wyoming Public Radio's Kelly Herbinson has this report on the importance of the botanical museum.

Jackson's Jewish Music Festival Begins Second Year
The three-week Jackson Hole Jewish Music Festival starts on Sunday. This is the festival's second year. And Executive Director Rabbi Zalman Mendelsohn says the event has grown out of a desire to bring a new kind of cultural experience to Jackson - and to give back to the local community.

Reporters' Roundtable
From gay marriage to guns to tax breaks it's been a busy Wyoming legislative session. Two reporters have followed the events closely. Jeremy Pelzer covers state government for the Casper Star Tribune and Michelle Dynes does the same for the Wyoming Tribune Eagle. They join me to give an insider's view of the proceedings.

On the Wind River Reservation, a Different View of Wolves
Many animals have significant symbolism to Native American cultures -- and for the Arapaho and Shoshone, one of those animals is the wolf. But integrating the wolf back into tribal culture and land may be a difficult proposition here in Wyoming, where ranchers and state organizations are keen on keeping them out. Wyoming Public Radio's Tristan Ahtone reports that in spite of negatively-held views of wolves, the Wind River Tribes are working to create management plans where wolves and livestock can live together.

Exploring "Cold" with Writer Bill StreeverĀ 
So far it's been a frigid February on the High Plains. And with days when high temperatures don't break zero, it's hard not to think about the cold. In his book titled "Cold," writer Bill Streever describes some of his own experiences, living and working as a biologist in Alaska. He writes about cold through history, and about the physiological effects of cold. He describes how we cope, and he writes about peculiar means of survival.

The Love Lives of Grasshoppers
From a walk through the snow, to a preview of spring Over the next few months, we will be running a series of short portraits of Wyoming species, reported and produced by Wyoming Public Radio's Kelly Herbinson. She starts the series this week with a special story for Valentine's Day. A look at the love lives of grasshoppers.
Wyoming voters rarely get a chance to change the constitution. But the legislature may give citizens the chance to vote on a gay marriage ban and even the right to hunt. As of Friday morning, five proposed constitutional amendments are still alive in the Wyoming legislature. Longtime observers say that's an unusually high number.