All Things Considered on Wyoming Public Radio

Monday - Friday 4:00PM-7:00PM
Melissa Block , Robert Siegel, and Audie Cornish

All Things Considered

Since its debut in 1971, this afternoon radio newsmagazine has delivered in-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Heard by almost 13 million* people on nearly 700 radio stations each week, All Things Considered is one of the most popular programs in America. Every weekday, hosts Melissa Block , Robert Siegel, and Audie Cornish present two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features. Guy Raz hosts a one-hour edition of the program on Saturday and Sunday.

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Monkey See
2:54 pm
Mon April 30, 2012

Can The Networks Ever Create Another Night Of 'Must-See TV'?

Jennifer Aniston and David Schwimmer appear in the baby birth episode of NBC's Friends.
AP

Originally published on Mon April 30, 2012 3:34 pm

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Around the Nation
3:17 pm
Sun April 29, 2012

A Broken City: Remembering The L.A. Riots

Originally published on Sun April 29, 2012 3:48 pm

Twenty years later, first-person accounts of the Los Angeles riots from Angelenos Titus Murphy, Ted Soqui and Rhonda Mitchell, who first told their stories to L.A. Magazine.

Music Interviews
8:03 am
Sun April 29, 2012

Marvin Sapp: Surviving Loss, 'Keeping It Moving'

Marvin Sapp's new album is titled I Win.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun April 29, 2012 3:48 pm

"Never Would Have Made It" is the biggest gospel hit of the past decade, and the man who sings it, Marvin Sapp, is quite possibly the biggest name in gospel today — a development that still surprises the Michigan pastor.

"I'm blown away by how that song has had the impact that it has had on so many people," Sapp tells NPR's Guy Raz. "All of us, I've learned, have gone through 'never would have made it' moments, and that's the reason why I believe that it resonates so strongly in so many people's lives."

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Monkey See
5:38 am
Sun April 29, 2012

Chris Colfer Goes From 'Glee' Singer To 'Struck' Screenwriter

Chris Colfer, writer and star of Struck By Lightning, at the Tribeca Film Festival, where the film is playing.
Larry Busacca Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 30, 2012 9:39 am

Chris Colfer, one of the stars of the hit TV show Glee, is known for his portrayal of Kurt, a confident and openly gay high school student (who also possesses pipes like a diva). In the new film Struck By Lightning, which Colfer wrote, he plays a very different character: Carson Phillips, an ambitious high school student who starts a literary magazine in order to get into Northwestern University. The character is arrogant and not exactly well-liked, so how does he collect submissions? By blackmailing the popular kids, of course.

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Asia
3:15 pm
Sat April 28, 2012

Seeking Refuge, Blind Chinese Activist Flees

Originally published on Sat April 28, 2012 4:07 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Guy Raz.

It's been more than a day now since news broke of a blind Chinese dissident's dramatic escape from house arrest. It's now thought that Chen Guangcheng secretly traveled 300 miles to the capital, Beijing, and is being sheltered on the grounds of the U.S. embassy there.

NPR's Beijing bureau chief is Louisa Lim, and she joins me now from there. Louisa, first off, is it clear that he is actually on embassy grounds?

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Music Interviews
1:49 pm
Sat April 28, 2012

Carrie Underwood: Country's 'Good Girl' Goes Dark

Carrie Underwood's new album is Blown Away.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sat April 28, 2012 4:07 pm

Since winning American Idol in 2005, Carrie Underwood has become one of the most popular country artists in the business. At the age of 29, she is tied with country legend Reba McEntire as the Female Country Artist with the most number one hits on the Billboard charts. Not bad for a girl from Checotah, Okla.

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Poetry
3:39 pm
Fri April 27, 2012

NewsPoet: Monica Youn Writes The Day In Verse

Monica Youn visits NPR headquarters in Washington on Friday.
Doriane Raiman NPR

Originally published on Wed July 25, 2012 9:20 am

Today at All Things Considered, we continue a project we're calling NewsPoet. Each month, we bring in a poet to spend time in the newsroom — and at the end of the day, to compose a poem reflecting on the day's stories.

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Book Reviews
1:57 pm
Fri April 27, 2012

Reivew: 'That Deadman Dance'

Originally published on Fri April 27, 2012 4:05 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Our book reviewer, Alan Cheuse, has been visiting the early days of British settlements in Australia. His means of transport is an award-winning novel called "That Dead Man Dance." It's by Australian writer Kim Scott.

ALAN CHEUSE, BYLINE: Cygnet River, the coast of southwestern Australia, early in the 19th century, first contact between the aboriginal Noongar people and the crew of settlers from England led by a well-meaning medical man named Dr. Cross. The Noongars are represented by young Bobby Wabalanginy.

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Opinion
12:22 pm
Fri April 27, 2012

For Baseball Fans, May the Force Be With You

Baseball's 10th player: you, on your couch, willing a win.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri April 27, 2012 4:05 pm

Hart Seely is the author of The Juju Rules: Or, How to Win Ballgames from Your Couch: A Memoir of a Fan Obsessed.

Remember that pod on the Death Star, where Darth Vader would go to be alone? Did you ever wonder what he was doing in there?

Well, I have a theory: I think he was watching ballgames.

The new baseball season is here. For me, it means reclaiming the war pod, the living room — or, as I prefer to call it: my personal corporate luxury skybox.

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You Must Read This
3:14 pm
Thu April 26, 2012

Something Wicked: A Haunting Must Read

Pride and Prejudice and Zombies and Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter." href="/post/something-wicked-haunting-must-read" class="noexit lightbox">
Seth Grahame-Smith is the author of Pride and Prejudice and Zombies and Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter.
Matthew Rudenberg

Originally published on Thu April 26, 2012 4:27 pm

Seth Grahame-Smith is the author of Unholy Night.

I know it's strange to be thinking about October right now, but whenever I write, in a way that's always where I am. Growing up in Connecticut, it always held a special place in my heart — "a rare month for boys," as Ray Bradbury begins Something Wicked This Way Comes.

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The Record
12:27 pm
Thu April 26, 2012

Marooned In L.A. For A Week, Coachella Bands Make Do

Ian St. Pe of the band Black Lips performs at this year's Coachella festival in Indio, Calif. Like many of the artists on the bill, the band agreed not to book other shows in Southern California within months of the event.
Michael Buckner Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 8:51 am

The massive Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival came to a close in California on Sunday after two weekends worth of sold-out shows by over 150 artists.

One of those acts was the Austin, Texas, band Explosions in the Sky, which first played Coachella back in 2007 and has seen its profile grow since then.

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Law
6:28 pm
Wed April 25, 2012

Immigration Brings High Drama To The High Court

This artist rendering shows Solicitor General Donald Verrilli speaking before the Supreme Court. Verrilli argued Wednesday that Arizona's immigration law steps into federal territory.
Dana Verkouteren AP

Originally published on Thu April 26, 2012 6:53 am

A majority of U.S. Supreme Court justices signaled Wednesday that they will uphold at least part of Arizona's controversial immigration law. Four provisions of the law were blocked by a federal appeals court last year, and while even some of the court's conservatives expressed skepticism about some of those provisions, a majority seemed willing to unblock the so-called "show me your papers" provisions.

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Music Reviews
2:24 pm
Wed April 25, 2012

The Sound Man Behind The Soul Of The Nation's Capital

Eccentric Soul: A Red Black Green Production (the cover detail of the album is above) revisits the influence of producer Robert Williams on the 1970s soul scene in Washington, D.C.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed April 25, 2012 8:07 pm

Most people wouldn't think of Washington, D.C., as one of R&B's great cities. Despite the fact that soul music greats Marvin Gaye and Roberta Flack grew up in D.C. neighborhoods, the city never had the equivalent of Detroit's Berry Gordy and Motown, or Memphis' Willie Mitchell and Hi Records. But in the early 1970s, D.C. did have producer Robert Williams and his Red, Black and Green Productions. A new compilation album called Eccentric Soul: A Red Black Green Production revisits Williams' influence on the sound of R&B in D.C.

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Space
3:37 pm
Tue April 24, 2012

Tech Entrepreneurs Bet Big On Asteroid Mining

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Today, a group of entrepreneurs unveiled a new company that aims to mine precious metals and other resources from asteroids. The idea of exploiting the natural resources on asteroids has been around for more than a century, and this is not the first company to lay out such grand plans.

But as NPR's Nell Greenfieldboyce reports, this one does have the financial backing of some big names in high tech.

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NPR Story
2:05 pm
Tue April 24, 2012

Student Loan Debt Exceeds One Trillion Dollars

Originally published on Tue April 24, 2012 3:37 pm

President Obama wants Congress to extend the 2007 College Cost Reduction and Access Act, which would freeze interest rates on subsidized Stafford student loans for one year. Melissa Block speaks with Mark Kantrowitz, a student loan expert and publisher of FinAid.org for a primer on student loans and repayments.

NPR Story
2:05 pm
Tue April 24, 2012

Senate Democrats Blast Arizona Immigration Law

Originally published on Tue April 24, 2012 3:37 pm

On the eve of oral arguments in an important immigration case before the U.S. Supreme Court, the issue came to Capitol Hill. On Tuesday, Democratic Senator Charles Schumer convened a Senate hearing on the controversial Arizona law.

Politics
3:11 pm
Mon April 23, 2012

When Politicians Slip, Video Trackers Are There

In politics, video tracking has become normal. And it's a growth industry. There are trackers working for campaigns, political parties and, increasingly, political action committees.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon April 23, 2012 6:25 pm

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Around the Nation
3:04 pm
Mon April 23, 2012

President Obama Takes Steps To End Mass Atrocities

Originally published on Mon April 23, 2012 5:39 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

President Obama toured the U.S. Holocaust Museum in Washington today joined by Holocaust survivor, author and Nobel Laureate, Elie Wiesel. Mr. Obama said the U.S. must never again allow such atrocities to take place.

As NPR's Don Gonyea reports, the president also announced new tools to punish countries that use technology to track and target their citizens.

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The Record
2:41 pm
Mon April 23, 2012

Remembering Bert Weedon, Guitar Teacher To Rock Stars (And Many More)

British guitarist Bert Weedon died Friday at age 91.
Keystone Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 23, 2012 5:39 pm

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NPR Story
2:41 pm
Mon April 23, 2012

Teen's Suicide Prompts Anti-Bullying Editorial

Originally published on Mon April 23, 2012 5:39 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Yesterday, the Sioux City Journal in Iowa did something it had never done before. It devoted the entire front page of its Sunday paper to an editorial. The headline, "We Must Stop Bullying, It Starts Here and It Starts Now." That editorial came soon after a 14-year-old Iowa boy named Kenneth Weishuhn committed suicide. He had been subjected to bullying and death threats after he told friends he was gay.

Mitch Pugh is editor of the Sioux City Journal and he joins me now.

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Books
3:30 pm
Sun April 22, 2012

Three-Minute Fiction

Originally published on Sun April 22, 2012 8:23 pm

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF CLOCK TICKING)

GUY RAZ, HOST:

She closed the book, placed it on the table and finally decided to walk through the door. That's the starting sentence for Round 8 of Three-Minute Fiction. That's our contest where we ask you to write an original short story that can be read in about three minutes. Our readers from across the country are combing through all of our 6,000 submissions this round. Let's hear a sample of their favorites so far.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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Around the Nation
3:30 pm
Sun April 22, 2012

Women Take Over The Farm

Originally published on Sun April 22, 2012 8:23 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

Staying in the middle of the country, you might have heard that America's farmers are getting older. Something else you probably know: women tend to outlive men. So do the math and what do you get? More women in charge of land and some who aren't really sure how to take care of it. So as Iowa Public Radio's Sarah McCammon reports, female conservationists are reaching out to this growing group.

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Interviews
3:03 pm
Sun April 22, 2012

Comparing Trayvon Martin, O.J. Simpson Cases

Originally published on Sun April 22, 2012 8:23 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

On Friday, TV audiences got their first taste of the media frenzy that could come with a televised Trayvon Martin trial when a Florida judge granted bail to George Zimmerman. That decision, whether to televise or not, has yet to be made.

Writer John McWhorter thinks it would be a very good thing. And in the latest issue of The New Republic, he argues that it could become a bookend to another famous and racially charged trial: the O.J. Simpson case.

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Europe
3:02 pm
Sun April 22, 2012

France's Sarkozy Faces Election Runoff

Originally published on Sun April 22, 2012 8:23 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Guy Raz.

President Nicolas Sarkozy and socialist rival Francois Hollande were the top vote-getters in the first round of the French presidential election today. They'll head to a runoff on May 6. NPR's Eleanor Beardsley in Paris sent us this report.

(SOUNDBITE OF CHEERS)

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Author Interviews
12:21 pm
Sun April 22, 2012

India: A Country In The Midst Of Change

Riverhead Books

Originally published on Sun April 22, 2012 8:23 pm

Akash Kapur is the son of an Indian father and an American mother. In 2003, after working professionally in New York City for more than a decade, he decided to return to India. As he writes in his book, India Becoming: A Portrait of Life in Modern India, he arrived in a place he hardly recognized.

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Music Lists
5:21 pm
Sat April 21, 2012

What's Hot On The Billboard Latin Charts

Brazilian superstar Michel Teló is burning up Billboard's Latin Songs chart with "Ai Se Eu Te Pego."
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun April 22, 2012 8:23 pm

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Pop Culture
3:00 pm
Sat April 21, 2012

Pop Culture's 40-Year Itch

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

And if you're just joining us, this is WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Guy Raz. And we're going to talk about music, movies and culture now, and in particular, about something known as the 40-year rule. Adam Gopnik is with us now from New York. He's written about it for the latest issue of The New Yorker. Hello, Adam.

ADAM GOPNIK: Hey, Guy. How are you?

RAZ: I'm good. Let's explain this with a pop quiz, Adam. You know the answers. so don't give it away because this is for the listeners.

GOPNIK: All right.

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Around the Nation
1:36 pm
Fri April 20, 2012

Shooter Apologizes To Trayvon Martin's Family

Originally published on Fri April 20, 2012 4:06 pm

It was supposed to be a routine and quick bond hearing for George Zimmerman, the neighborhood watch volunteer who killed teenager Trayvon Martin. Friday's court hearing was anything but routine; Zimmerman took the stand and apologized to Martin's parents.

Sports
1:36 pm
Fri April 20, 2012

Rockies' Pitcher Jamie Moyer Sets Age Record

Originally published on Fri April 20, 2012 4:06 pm

Tuesday night, Colorado Rockies pitcher Jamie Moyer became the oldest pitcher to win a Major League Baseball game at the age of 49. He pitched the Rockies to a win of 5-to-3 over the San Diego Padres. Melissa Block talks to Moyer about the game and his career.

Deceptive Cadence
1:21 pm
Fri April 20, 2012

To Russia, With Musical Love — After 22 Years' Absence

An advertisement in Moscow for the Chicago Symphony Orchestra's first concerts in Russia in more than two decades.
Todd Rosenberg Courtesy of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra

Originally published on Fri April 20, 2012 4:06 pm

This week, music is bringing Americans and Russians together in a way that policy discussions never can. And don't call that a cliche in front of the music director of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra.

If U.S. relations with Russia have hit a sticky patch over Syria and other issues lately, that didn't stop the Chicago Symphony from thrilling a Russian audience this past Wednesday night, just as it did on its last visit — to the then-Soviet Union in 1990.

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